Ursula Le Guin


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Ursula Kroeber Le Guin (born October 21, 1929) is an American author of novels, children's books, and short stories, mainly in the genres of fantasy and science fiction. She has also written poetry and essays. First published in the 1960s, her work has often depicted futuristic or imaginary alternative worlds in politics, natural environment, gender, religion, sexuality and ... more »

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  • ''He is far too intelligent to become really cerebral.''
    Ursula K. Le Guin (b. 1929), U.S. author. repr. In Dancing at the Edge of the World (1989). "Review of Difficult Loves by Italo Calvino," Washington P...
  • ''If science fiction is the mythology of modern technology, then its myth is tragic.''
    Ursula K. Le Guin (b. 1929), U.S. author. repr. In Dancing at the Edge of the World (1989). "The Carrier Bag Theory of Fiction," (written 1986), first...
  • ''In so far as one denies what is, one is possessed by what is not, the compulsions, the fantasies, the terrors that flock to fill the void.''
    Ursula K. Le Guin (b. 1929), U.S. author. The Lathe of Heaven, ch. 10 (1971).
  • ''When action grows unprofitable, gather information; when information grows unprofitable, sleep.''
    Ursula K. Le Guin (b. 1929), U.S. author. The Left Hand of Darkness, ch. 3 (1969).
  • ''The unread story is not a story; it is little black marks on wood pulp. The reader, reading it, makes it live: a live thing, a story.''
    Ursula K. Le Guin (b. 1929), U.S. author. "Where Do You Get Your Ideas From?" Dancing at the Edge of the World (1989).
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Best Poem of Ursula Le Guin

The Maenads

Somewhere I read
that when they finally staggered off the mountain
into some strange town, past drunk,
hoarse, half naked, blear-eyed,
blood dried under broken nails
and across young thighs,
but still jeering and joking, still trying
to dance, lurching and yelling, but falling
dead asleep by the market stalls,
sprawled helpless, flat out, then
middle-aged women,
respectable housewives,
would come and stand nightlong in the agora
silent
together
as ewes and cows in the night fields,
guarding, watching them
as their mothers
watched over ...

Read the full of The Maenads

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