William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Poems

161. Helen's Soliloqy (All's Well That Ends Well) 3/3/2015
162. Sonnet Cxxv 5/18/2001
163. Sonnet Cxi 5/18/2001
164. Sonnet 72: O, Lest The World Should Task You To Recite 1/13/2003
165. Sonnet Cxiv 5/18/2001
166. Sonnets Xciv: They That Have Power To Hurt And Will Do None 1/1/2004
167. Sonnet Clii 5/18/2001
168. Sonnet Cxxix 5/18/2001
169. Sonnet 59: If There Be Nothing New, But That Which Is 1/13/2003
170. Sonnet 93: So Shall I Live, Supposing Thou Art True 3/30/2010
171. Sonnet 56: Sweet Love, Renew Thy Force, Be It Not Said 1/13/2003
172. Sonnet 82: I Grant Thou Wert Not Married To My Muse 1/13/2003
173. Sonnet Cvii 5/18/2001
174. Sonnet Cliii 5/18/2001
175. Sonnet Cxi: O, For My Sake Do You With Fortune Chide 1/3/2003
176. Sonnet 15: 3/30/2010
177. Sonnet 146: 3/30/2010
178. Sonnet 7: Lo, In The Orient When The Gracious Light 1/13/2003
179. Sonnet 53: What Is Your Substance, Whereof Are You Made 1/13/2003
180. Sonnet Cxx 5/18/2001
181. Sonnet 74: But Be Contented When That Fell Arrest 1/13/2003
182. Sonnet Civ 5/18/2001
183. Sonnet Cvi 5/18/2001
184. Sonnet Cli 5/18/2001
185. Sonnets Cxvi: Let Me Not To The Marriage Of True Minds 1/1/2004
186. Sonnet 77: Thy Glass Will Show Thee How Thy Beauties Wear 1/13/2003
187. Sonnet 44: If The Dull Substance Of My Flesh Were Thought 1/13/2003
188. Sonnet 80: O, How I Faint When I Of You Do Write 1/13/2003
189. Sonnet 14: “not From The Stars Do I My Judgement Pluck…” 3/30/2010
190. Sonnet Cxii 5/18/2001
191. Sonnet Cxxviii 5/18/2001
192. Sonnet 67: Ah, Wherefore With Infection Should He Live 1/13/2003
193. Sonnet 45: The Other Two, Slight Air And Purging Fire 1/13/2003
194. Sonnet 92: But Do Thy Worst To Steal Thyself Away 3/30/2010
195. Sonnet Cxlvii 5/18/2001
196. Sonnets X 1/4/2003
197. Sonnet 48: How Careful Was I, When I Took My Way 1/13/2003
198. Sonnet 52: So Am I As The Rich Whose BlessÈD Key 1/13/2003
199. Sonnet Cxxii 5/18/2001
200. Sonnet 70: That Thou Art Blamed Shall Not Be Thy Defect 1/13/2003

Comments about William Shakespeare

  • Dan Reynolds Dan Reynolds (9/23/2014 7:30:00 AM)

    You show some promise, but the archaic language lets you down. Try to read some good contemporary poets and expand your thoughts without the restriction of form.

    223 person liked.
    173 person did not like.
  • Zoila T. Flores Zoila T. Flores (8/2/2014 12:54:00 PM)

    To be or Not to be....
    On my soul, my eyes can see,
    When my goodness, comes to me.
    Shifting goodness,
    Over madness, I agree!

  • Asharaf East (6/20/2014 9:25:00 PM)

    Ya

  • Douglas Scotney (4/24/2014 2:26:00 AM)

    He felt very guilty when his son, Hamnet, died at Stratford at 11 years of age in 1596, while he was in London. Did he blame his wife and make her the Queen in Hamlet?

  • Parul Naveen (3/1/2014 12:50:00 AM)

    very nice poem.
    our life is just like that stage which is talk about in this poem.
    William Shakespeare is a great poet.

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  • Wahab Abdul Wahab Abdul (12/12/2013 2:02:00 AM)

    Shakespeare employed the pathetic fallacy, or the attribution of human characteristics or emotions to elements in nature or inanimate objects, throughout his plays. In the sonnets, the speaker frequently employs the pathetic fallacy, associating his absence from the young man to the freezing days of December and the promise of their reunion to a pregnant spring. Weather and the seasons also stand in for human emotions: the speaker conveys his sense of foreboding about death by likening himself to autumn, a time in which nature’s objects begin to decay and ready themselves for winter, or death. Similarly, despite the arrival of “proud-pied April” (2) in Sonnet 98, the speaker still feels as if it were winter because he and the young man are apart. The speaker in Sonnet 18, one of Shakespeare’s most famous poems, begins by rhetorically asking the young man, “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? ” (1) . He spends the remainder of the poem explaining the multiple ways in which the young man is superior to a summer day, ultimately concluding that while summer ends, the young man’s beauty lives on in the permanence of poetry.

  • Sanjay Singh Saharan Sanjay Singh Saharan (11/2/2013 6:42:00 AM)

    this poem is very nice

  • Laurel Vijitha ... Laurel Vijitha ... (10/10/2013 10:26:00 AM)

    whn he writes a poem n whn v read it cums to reality! ! he's just awsm! ! n I even lyk Robert Frost

  • Jaden Smith (7/11/2013 11:33:00 AM)

    just as Luis responded I didn't even know that any body able to make $9524 in a few weeks on the internet. have you seen this web link Dub40.com

Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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