Ellis Parker Butler

Ellis Parker Butler Poems

She plucked a blossom fair to see;
Upon my coat I let her pin it;
And thus we stood beneath the tree
A minute.
...

To be a great musician you must be a man of moods,
You have to be, to understand sonatas and etudes.
To execute pianos and to fiddle with success,
...

When first we met she seemed so white
I feared her;
As one might near a spirit bright
...

In our dainty little kitchen,
Where my aproned wife is queen
Over all the tin-pan people,
In a realm exceeding clean,
...

Listen, ladies, while I sing
The ballad of John Henry King.

John Henry was a bachelor,
...

Whene’er I feed the barnyard folk
My gentle soul is vexed;
My sensibilities are torn
...

A Scotchman whose name was Isbister
Had a maiden giraffe he called 'sister'
When she said 'Oh, be mine,
Be my sweet Valentine!'
...

1775

Said Congress to George Washington:
"To set this country free,
...

When young, in tones quite positive
I said, "The world shall see
That I can keep myself from sin;
A good man I will be."
...

O wonderful! In sport we climbed the tree,
Eager and laughing, as in all our play,
To see the eggs where, in the nest, they lay,
...

Behold, my child, this touching scene,
The golfer on the golfing-green;
Pray mark his legs’ uncanny swing,
The golf-walk is a gruesome thing!
...

Mary had a little frog
And it was water-soaked,
But Mary did not keep it long
...

They hide in the brook when I seek to draw nearer,
Laughing amain when I feign to depart;
Often I hear them, now faint and now clearer—
...

Just as the sun was setting
Back of the Western hills
Grandfather stood by the window
Eating the last of his pills.
...

Oh! Montmorency Vere de Vere,
To think that one I held so dear
Should use a base deceiver’s art
To trifle with my loving heart.
...

Ho, ye lovers, list to me;
Warning words have I for thee:
Give ye heed, hefore ye wed,
To this thing Sir Chaucer said:
...

Cupid on a summer day,
Wearied by unceasing play,
In a rose heart sleeping lay,
While, to guard the tricksy fellow,
...

Well, then! How'd you like to bear the name of Butler
As an honor badge eight centuries at least,
And then have the Prohibitionists inform you
...

Saint Peter stood, at Heaven's gate,
All souls claims to adjudicate
Saying to some souls, 'Enter in!'
...

20.

The deer's a mighty useful beast
From Petersburg to Tennyson
For while he lives he lopes around
...

Ellis Parker Butler Biography

Ellis Parker Butler was an American author.

Biography

Butler was born in Muscatine, Iowa. He was the author of more than 30 books and more than 2,000 stories and essays, and is most famous for his short story "Pigs is Pigs", in which a bureaucratic stationmaster insists on levying the livestock rate for a shipment of two pet guinea pigs, which soon start proliferating geometrically.

Working from his home in Flushing (Queens) New York, Butler was—by every measure and by many times—the most published author of the pulp fiction era. Amongst others he wrote twenty-five stories to Woman's Home Companion between 1906 and 1935. The stories in the Companion were illustrated by artists including May Wilson Preston, Frederic Dorr Steele, Herbert Paus and Rico Le Brun. Between 1931 and 1936, at least seventeen of Butler's stories published in newspapers were enhanced by noted illustrator Ethel Hays.

His career spanned more than forty years and his stories, poems and articles were published in more than 225 magazines. His work appeared alongside that of his contemporaries including Mark Twain, Sax Rohmer, James B. Hendryx, Berton Braley, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Don Marquis, Will Rogers and Edgar Rice Burroughs.

Despite the enormous volume of his work, Butler was, for most of his life, only a part-time author. He worked full-time as a banker and was very active in his local community. A founding member of both the Dutch Treat Club and the Author's League of America, Butler was an always-present force in the New York City literary scene.

He died in Williamsville, Massachusetts and was interred in Flushing Cemetery.

The Best Poem Of Ellis Parker Butler

A Minute

She plucked a blossom fair to see;
Upon my coat I let her pin it;
And thus we stood beneath the tree
A minute.

She turned her smiling face to me;
I saw a roguish sweetness in it;
I kissed her once;—it took, maybe,
A minute.

The time was paltry, you’ll agree;
It took but little to begin it;
But since my heart has not been free
A minute.

Ellis Parker Butler Comments

hi bros 05 October 2018

Putos pillo me la pela y no entendi ni Puta madre Lalo esta bien pendejo a la otra expliquen mejor ya que no dicen nada de la ballad of a bachelor

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