Gilbert Keith Chesterton

(29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936 / London, England)

Gilbert Keith Chesterton
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Gilbert Keith Chesterton was an English writer. He published works on philosophy, ontology, poetry, plays, journalism, public lectures and debates, literary and art criticism, biography, Christian apologetics, and fiction, including fantasy and detective fiction. Chesterton has been called the "prince of paradox". Time magazine, in a review of a biography of Chesterton, observed of his writing style: "Whenever possible Chesterton made his points with popular sayings, proverbs, allegories—first carefully turning them inside out." For example, Chesterton wrote "Thieves respect property. They merely wish the property to become their property that they may more perfectly... more »

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Quotations

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  • ''The vulgar man is always the most distinguished, for the very desire to be distinguished is vulgar.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Boy," All Things Considered (1908).
  • ''If prosperity is regarded as the reward of virtue it will be regarded as the symptom of virtue.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Book of Job," G.K.C. as M.C. (1929).
  • ''A cosmic philosophy is not constructed to fit a man; a cosmic philosophy is constructed to fit a cosmos. A man can no more possess a private religion than he can possess a private sun and moon.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Book of Job," G.K.C. as M.C. (1929).
  • ''Half a truth is better than no politics.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. "The Boy," All Things Considered (1908).
  • ''The poor have sometimes objected to being governed badly; the rich have always objected to being governed at all.''
    Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936), British author. Ratcliffe, in The Man Who Was Thursday, ch. 11 (1908).
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Best Poem of Gilbert Keith Chesterton

A Prayer In Darkness

This much, O heaven—if I should brood or rave,
Pity me not; but let the world be fed,
Yea, in my madness if I strike me dead,
Heed you the grass that grows upon my grave.

If I dare snarl between this sun and sod,
Whimper and clamour, give me grace to own,
In sun and rain and fruit in season shown,
The shining silence of the scorn of God.

Thank God the stars are set beyond my power,
If I must travail in a night of wrath,
Thank God my tears will never vex a moth,
Nor any curse of mine cut down a flower.
...

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