Lucius Furius


Adam And Eve - Poem by Lucius Furius

Death is the mother of beauty; hence from her,
Alone, shall come fulfillment to our dreams
And our desires. Although she strews the leaves
Of sure obliteration on our paths, …
- Wallace Stevens' 'Sunday Morning'

In Eden fair did Adam and Eve
live in perfect harmony.
'No plant or animal devoureth we,
only ripe fruit as falls from the tree.'
By bright-green lily-pads in sphagnum bogs
the herons waded gracefully,
bullfrogs croaked their deep, clear calls;
bluebells, delicate yellow buttercups
were rampant; larks sang in the mulberries.

'No pain or hunger knew we there,
only the sameness of Eden fair.'
Even the bounty, the beauty, the civility,
the rich perfection, stretching out like the wall
of the great oval garden, day after day,
year after year to eternity,
grew tiresome.

'No shame in our nakedness knew we...
nor lust, nor desire, nor carnality.'
It's the exogamous, the unfamiliar,
which stirs in us the deepest passion,
the basso continuo of mortality
which gives to desire its piquancy
- of which they knew nothing in deathless Eden.

'We wanted to look outside the wall.
We didn't mean from God's grace to fall.'
Their lack of control, their disrespect
invited tragedy….
But to deny what one feels,
to deny what one is
is to risk even greater calamity….

'God expelled us from the Garden.
Now we'll know death and all that's human.'
Discord... despair…. Are you better off?
Coaxing grain from the cracked, parched earth?
Maybe you paid too much for your freedom? ...
Maybe you wish you were back in the Garden? ...

'There be good inside the Garden;
there be good outside.…
There is no perfect Eden.'

Topic(s) of this poem: eden, eternity, freedom, god

Form: Lyric


Poet's Notes about The Poem

This poem is one of the Humanist Art Homepage, Scraps of Faith poems.

Comments about Adam And Eve by Lucius Furius

  • Drtony Brahmin (6/24/2017 1:58:00 PM)

    bullfrogs croaked their deep, clear calls;
    bluebells, delicate yellow buttercups
    No shame in our nakedness knew we...
    nor lust, nor desire, nor carnality.'
    Their lack of control, their disrespect
    invited tragedy
    Maybe you wish you were back in the Garden?
    These are the points i collected after carefully reading your poem.. you have wonderful imagination and you express what comes to your mind very well. the reader understands you at once. Thank you dear poet. thank u for sharing. tony
    A great poem indeed! !
    (Report)Reply

    Lucius Furius(7/3/2017 2:55:00 PM)

    One more thing, in regard to the reader understands you at once. It's *very* important to me that the poem be immediately understandable - not requiring research or puzzling out.

    Lucius Furius(7/3/2017 2:16:00 PM)

    Thanks, Tony. This is definitely one of poems I'm proudest of. I'm glad you found it valuable. Lucius

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Poem Submitted: Friday, May 26, 2017

Poem Edited: Saturday, August 12, 2017


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