George William Russell

(10 April 1867 – 17 July 1935 / Lurgan, County Armagh, Ireland)

By The Margin Of The Great Deep - Poem by George William Russell

WHEN the breath of twilight blows to flame the misty skies,
All its vaporous sapphire, violet glow and silver gleam,
With their magic flood me through the gateway of the eyes;
   I am one with the twilight's dream.

When the trees and skies and fields are one in dusky mood,
Every heart of man is rapt within the mother's breast:
Full of peace and sleep and dreams in the vasty quietude,
   I am one with their hearts at rest.

From our immemorial joys of hearth and home and love
Stray'd away along the margin of the unknown tide,
All its reach of soundless calm can thrill me far above
   Word or touch from the lips beside.

Aye, and deep and deep and deeper let me drink and draw
From the olden fountain more than light or peace or dream,
Such primaeval being as o'erfills the heart with awe,
   Growing one with its silent stream.


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Read poems about / on: magic, peace, dream, silver, mother, sleep, home, light, heart, joy, sky, tree



Poem Submitted: Saturday, January 4, 2003

Poem Edited: Monday, May 7, 2012


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