William Blake

(28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827 / London)

I Rose Up At The Dawn Of Day - Poem by William Blake

I rose up at the dawn of day--
`Get thee away! get thee away!
Pray'st thou for riches? Away! away!
This is the Throne of Mammon grey.'

Said I: This, sure, is very odd;
I took it to be the Throne of God.
For everything besides I have:
It is only for riches that I can crave.

I have mental joy, and mental health,
And mental friends, and mental wealth;
I've a wife I love, and that loves me;
I've all but riches bodily.

I am in God's presence night and day,
And He never turns His face away;
The accuser of sins by my side doth stand,
And he holds my money-bag in his hand.

For my worldly things God makes him pay,
And he'd pay for more if to him I would pray;
And so you may do the worst you can do;
Be assur'd, Mr. Devil, I won't pray to you.

Then if for riches I must not pray,
God knows, I little of prayers need say;
So, as a church is known by its steeple,
If I pray it must be for other people.

He says, if I do not worship him for a God,
I shall eat coarser food, and go worse shod;
So, as I don't value such things as these,
You must do, Mr. Devil, just as God please.


Comments about I Rose Up At The Dawn Of Day by William Blake

  • Dawn Fuzan (5/6/2014 10:04:00 AM)


    well writen poem william (Report) Reply

    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Brian Jani (5/3/2014 2:59:00 AM)


    Good poetry William.I like this one (Report) Reply

Read all 2 comments »



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Read poems about / on: money, god, food, rose, joy, people, night, friend



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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