Robert Louis Stevenson

(1850-1894 / Edinburgh / Scotland)

In Charidemum - Poem by Robert Louis Stevenson

YOU, Charidemus, who my cradle swung,
And watched me all the days that I was young;
You, at whose step the laziest slaves awake,
And both the bailiff and the butler quake;
The barber's suds now blacken with my beard,
And my rough kisses make the maids afeared;
But with reproach your awful eyebrows twitch,
And for the cane, I see, your fingers itch.
If something daintily attired I go,
Straight you exclaim: "Your father did not so."
And fuming, count the bottles on the board
As though my cellar were your private hoard.
Enough, at last: I have done all I can,
And your own mistress hails me for a man.


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Read poems about / on: father, kiss



Poem Submitted: Tuesday, December 31, 2002



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