Robert Louis Stevenson

(1850-1894 / Edinburgh / Scotland)

Robert Louis Stevenson Poems

1. The Mirror Speaks 4/7/2015
2. The Feast Of Famine 7/1/2015
3. My Body, Which My Dungeon Is 5/22/2015
4. The Light Keeper 10/21/2015
5. To Mrs. Will. H. Low. 3/26/2015
6. Underwoods: Epigram 1/29/2015
7. The Sick Child 4/24/2015
8. Fifteen Men On The Dead Man's Chest 12/11/2015
9. My House, I Say 1/9/2015
10. There Was An Old Man Of The Cape 2/4/2015
11. Consolation 3/6/2015
12. Wedding Prayer 2/3/2015
13. To Mesdames Zassetsky And Garschine 12/31/2002
14. To Miss Cornish 12/31/2002
15. To Madame Garschine 12/31/2002
16. To Rosabelle 12/31/2002
17. Sonet Vi 12/31/2002
18. Sonnet Viii 12/31/2002
19. To Marcus 12/31/2002
20. Youth And Love 3/30/2010
21. Frag2 12/31/2002
22. Frag1 12/31/2002
23. I, Whom Apollo Somtime Visited 12/31/2002
24. To Charles Baxter 12/31/2002
25. To N. V. De G. S. 3/30/2010
26. Hail, Guest, And Enter Freely! 12/31/2002
27. In Charidemum 12/31/2002
28. For Richmond's Garden Wall 12/31/2002
29. The Relic Taken, What Avails The Shrine? 12/31/2002
30. I Do Not Fear To Own Me Kin 12/31/2002
31. I Am Like One That For Long Days Had Sate 12/31/2002
32. O Dull Cold Northern Sky 12/31/2002
33. Since Years Ago For Evermore 12/31/2002
34. Light As The Linnet On My Way I Start 12/31/2002
35. Sonnet Vii 12/31/2002
36. Variant Form Of The Preceding Poem 12/31/2002
37. In The States 1/3/2003
38. Henry James 1/3/2003
39. The Clock's Clear Voice Into The Clearer Air 12/31/2002
40. My Heart, When First The Black-Bird Sings 3/30/2010
Best Poem of Robert Louis Stevenson

Love, What Is Love

LOVE - what is love? A great and aching heart;
Wrung hands; and silence; and a long despair.
Life - what is life? Upon a moorland bare
To see love coming and see love depart.

Read the full of Love, What Is Love

Sonnet I

NOR judge me light, tho' light at times I seem,
And lightly in the stress of fortune bear
The innumerable flaws of changeful care -
Nor judge me light for this, nor rashly deem
(Office forbid to mortals, kept supreme
And separate the prerogative of God!)
That seaman idle who is borne abroad
To the far haven by the favouring stream.
Not he alone that to contrarious seas

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