William Ernest Henley

(1849 - 1902 / Gloucester / England)

In The Dials - Poem by William Ernest Henley

To GARRYOWEN upon an organ ground
Two girls are jigging. Riotously they trip,
With eyes aflame, quick bosoms, hand on hip,
As in the tumult of a witches' round.
Youngsters and youngsters round them prance and bound.
Two solemn babes twirl ponderously, and skip.
The artist's teeth gleam from his bearded lip.
High from the kennel howls a tortured hound.
The music reels and hurtles, and the night
Is full of stinks and cries; a naphtha-light
Flares from a barrow; battered and obtused
With vices, wrinkles, life and work and rags,
Each with her inch of clay, two loitering hags
Look on dispassionate--critical--something 'mused.


Comments about In The Dials by William Ernest Henley

  • (11/18/2015 10:36:00 PM)


    ........an interesting write ★ (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Monday, April 12, 2010



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