Henry Van Dyke

(10 November 1852 – 10 April 1933 / Germantown, Pennsylvania)

Indian Summer - Poem by Henry Van Dyke

A soft veil dims the tender skies,
And half conceals from pensive eyes
The bronzing tokens of the fall;
A calmness broods upon the hills,
And summer's parting dream distills
A charm of silence over all.

The stacks of corn, in brown array,
Stand waiting through the placid day,
Like tattered wigwams on the plain;
The tribes that find a shelter there
Are phantom peoples, forms of air,
And ghosts of vanished joy and pain.

At evening when the crimson crest
Of sunset passes down the West,
I hear the whispering host returning;
On far-off fields, by elm and oak,
I see the lights, I smell the smoke,--
The Camp-fires of the Past are burning.


Comments about Indian Summer by Henry Van Dyke

  • Edward Kofi Louis (5/30/2016 10:13:00 AM)


    A charm of silence! ! Thanks for sharing this poem with us. (Report) Reply

    2 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • Edward Kofi Louis (5/30/2016 10:13:00 AM)


    A charm os silence! ! Thanks for sharing this poem with us. (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: sunset, silence, summer, dream, joy, pain, fire, sky



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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