Henry Van Dyke

Henry Van Dyke Poems

Time is
Too Slow for those who Wait,
Too Swift for those who Fear,
Too Long for those who Grieve,
...

I put my heart to school
In the world, where men grow wise,
'Go out,' I said, 'and learn the rule;
Come back when you win a prize.'
...

3.

Let me but do my work from day to day,
In field or forest, at the desk or loom,
In roaring market-place or tranquil room;
Let me but find it in my heart to say,
...

'Tis fine to see the Old World and travel up and down
Among the famous palaces and cities of renown,
To admire the crumblyh castles and the statues and kings
But now I think I've had enough of antiquated things.
...

Lord Jesus, Thou hast known
A mother's love and tender care:
And Thou wilt hear, while for my own
Mother most dear I make this birthday prayer.
...

I read within a poet's book
A word that starred the page:
'Stone walls do not a prison make,
Nor iron bars a cage! '
...

I love thine inland seas,
Thy groves of giant trees,
Thy rolling plains;
Thy rivers' mighty sweep,
...

Oh, why are you shining so bright, big Sun,
And why is the garden so gay?
Do you know that my days of delight are done,
Do you know I am going away?
...

There are songs for the morning and songs for the night,
For sunrise and sunset, the stars and the moon;
But who will give praise to the fulness of light,
And sing us a song of the glory of noon?
...

10.

Let me but live my life from year to year,
With forward face and unreluctant soul;
Not hurrying to, nor turning from the goal;
Not mourning for the things that disappear
...

The mountains that enfold the vale
With walls of granite, steep and high,
Invite the fearless foot to scale
Their stairway toward the sky.
...

Our college rhymes,--how light they seem,
Like little ghosts of love's young dream
That led our boyish hearts away
From lectures and from books, to stray
...

When to the garden of untroubled thought
I came of late, and saw the open door,
And wished again to enter, and explore
The sweet, wild ways with stainless bloom inwrought,
...

O who will walk a mile with me
Along life's merry way?
A comrade blithe and full of glee,
Who dares to laugh out loud and free,
...

A soft veil dims the tender skies,
And half conceals from pensive eyes
The bronzing tokens of the fall;
A calmness broods upon the hills,
...

I envy every flower that blows
Along the meadow where she goes,
And every bird that sings to her,
And every breeze that brings to her
...

When the frosty kiss of Autumn in the dark
Makes its mark
On the flowers, and the misty morning grieves
Over fallen leaves;
...

When down the stair at morning
The sunbeams round her float,
Sweet rivulets of laughter
Are bubbling in her throat;
...

Home, for my heart still calls me;
Home, through the danger zone;
Home, whatever befalls me,
I will sail again to my own!
...

"Christ of the Andes," Christ of Everywhere,
Great lover of the hills, the open air,
And patient lover of impatient men
Who blindly strive and sin and strive again, --
...

Henry Van Dyke Biography

Henry Jackson van Dyke was an American author, educator, and clergyman. Biography Henry van Dyke was born on November 11 , 1852 in Germantown, Pennsylvania in the United States. He graduated from Princeton University in 1873 and from Princeton Theological Seminary, 1877 and served as a professor of English literature at Princeton between 1899 and 1923. In 1908-09 Dr. van Dyke was an American lecturer at the University of Paris. By appointment of President Wilson he became Minister to the Netherlands and Luxembourg in 1913. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters and received many other honors. Van Dyke was an "ardent foe of the annexation of the Philippines, [and] told his congregation in 1898, 'If we enter the course of foreign conquest, the day is not far distant when we must spend in annual preparation for wars more than the $180,000,000 that we now spend every year in the education of our children for peace.' He chaired the committee that wrote the first Presbyterian printed liturgy, The Book of Common Worship of 1906. Among his popular writings are the two Christmas stories, The Other Wise Man (1896) and The First Christmas Tree (1897). Various religious themes of his work are also expressed in his poetry, hymns and the essays collected in Little Rivers (1895) and Fisherman’s Luck (1899). He wrote the lyrics to the popular hymn, "Joyful, Joyful We Adore Thee" (1907), sung to the tune of Beethoven's "Ode to Joy". He compiled several short stories in The Blue Flower (1902), named after the key symbol of Romanticism introduced first by Novalis. He also contributed a chapter to the collaborative novel, The Whole Family (1908). Among his poems is "Katrina's Sundial", the inspiration for the song, "Time Is", by the group It's a Beautiful Day on their eponymous 1969 debut album. Furthermore, the lyrics of a song — entitled "Time", sung by Mark Masri — are mostly inspired by the following quote, written by Henry van Dyke: "Time is too slow for those who wait, too swift for those who fear, too long for those who grieve, too short for those who rejoice, but for those who love — time is eternity". A biography of Van Dyke, titled Henry Van Dyke: A Biography, was written by his son Tertius van Dyke and published in 1935.)

The Best Poem Of Henry Van Dyke

Time Is

Time is
Too Slow for those who Wait,
Too Swift for those who Fear,
Too Long for those who Grieve,
Too Short for those who Rejoice;
But for those who Love,
Time is not.

Henry Van Dyke Comments

Nancie O'sullivan 07 June 2010

I have been asked to read the poem of Henry Van Dyke, Gone From My Sight, at a memorial service,6/12/10 and give an introduction. If you have a an insight or comments into this poem, and when and why it was written, I'd appreciate hearing whatever it is that you wish to share. Thanks, Nancie

101 20 Reply
Bill Klein 28 July 2005

To Tess A: We are reading this same poem at my father-in-law's memorial service. I was searching for info on Henry van Dyke and whether he actually wrote this poem. Here it is: I am standing upon the sea shore. A ship at my side spreads her white sails to the morning breeze and starts for the blue ocean. She is an object of beauty and strength. I stand and watch her until at length she hangs like a speck of white cloud just where the sea and sky come to mingle with each other. Then someone at my side says; “There, she is gone! ” “Gone where? ” Gone from my sight. That is all. She is just as large in mast and hull and spar as she was when she left my side and she is just as able to bear her load of living freight to her destined port. Her diminished size is in me, not in her. And just at that moment when someone at my side says, “There, she is gone! ” There are other eyes watching her and other voices ready to take up the glad shout, “Here she comes! ” And that is dying. Henry Van Dyke

93 12 Reply
Tess A 02 February 2005

am looking for a Henry Van Dyke. poem and it startes with this I am standing Upon the seashore...

77 14 Reply
chicken 22 November 2021

epik poems

0 0 Reply
chiclen 22 November 2021

cool poems

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Kumarmani Mahakul 05 November 2020

Henry Van who is raked #142 on top 500 poets on date 05 November 2020, has created new history through his natural and brilliant perseverance in writing. We read his poems with much eagerness. We love to feel his duty and responsibility for literature. An amazing sharing is done really!

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Dolores Pender 30 November 2018

What book can I find the poem called The Parable of Immortality by Henry Van

2 0 Reply
John Lanphear 12 August 2017

Hello everyone. I am in possession of 25 hand written and or typed letters from Henry Van Dyke. If anyone can connect me with anyone that would be interested to purchase, please reach out.

2 7 Reply

chicken kingggg i wanna buy them!

0 0 Reply
joe 13 April 2021

ok

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