William Wordsworth

(1770-1850 / Cumberland / England)

Memorials Of A Tour In Scotland, 1803 Xiv. Fly, Some Kind Haringer, To Grasmere-Dale - Poem by William Wordsworth

FLY, some kind Harbinger, to Grasmere-dale!
Say that we come, and come by this day's light;
Fly upon swiftest wing round field and height,
But chiefly let one Cottage hear the tale;
There let a mystery of joy prevail,
The kitten frolic, like a gamesome sprite,
And Rover whine, as at a second sight
Of near-approaching good that shall not fail:
And from that Infant's face let joy appear;
Yea, let our Mary's one companion child--
That hath her six weeks' solitude beguiled
With intimations manifold and dear,
While we have wandered over wood and wild--
Smile on his Mother now with bolder cheer.


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Poem Submitted: Monday, April 5, 2010



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