Season Poem by Daniel Mentor

Season

Rating: 5.0


Nature's pedant, friendly foe
Time's tide - must you
In winter wind the earth
Dampen the fields and frighten the creatures
Must you wail in storms and darken the skies?
Must you force the trees dance atilogu?
Must to your calls antique mountains echo?
And clap clap the rain in crescendo


Pedant of ageless nature
Must you in summer scotch?
Dry the moor and make earth barren
Must your servants encroach on us?
Have you no pity? You brute!
A little rain can't kill us
This heat, is it vendetta?
Your solder, the sun, can he not die?

Nature's pedant, rude companion, must you?
Remind man of reckoning
Summer, winter, autumn, harmattan,
your poor thankless hands
Must you erode the earth in myriads
of meandering tributaries
Take your winter and your summer
Your wretched servants all
Would it fall the heavens?
Or send mother earth extinct?

Thursday, January 19, 2023
Topic(s) of this poem: imagery,metaphor,metaphysical,supernatural,earth,season,human nature,winter,summer,nature,personification
POET'S NOTES ABOUT THE POEM
In this poem, Daniel Mentor takes a jibe at season. ridiculing it as nothing but nature's time-keeper. An important element of nature, however; a brute. Here, Season is awarded human behavior. Capable of inflicting harm. The poet also noted the importance of season in a unique form of sarcasm. There's a lot of personification, metaphors and rhetorical questions.
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