Sir Philip Sidney

(1554 - 1586 / Kent / England)

Sonnet 79: Sweet Kiss, Thy Sweets I Fain - Poem by Sir Philip Sidney

Sweet kiss, thy sweets I fain would sweetly endite,
Which even of sweetness sweetest sweet'ner art:
Pleasing'st consort, where each sense holds a part;
Which, coupling doves, guides Venus' chariot right;

Best charge, and bravest retreat in Cupid's fight,
A double key, which opens to the heart,
Most rich, when most his riches it impart;
Nest of young joys, schoolmaster of delight,

Teaching the mean at once to take and give;
The friendly fray, where blows both wound and heal,
The pretty death, while each in other live;

Poor hope's first wealth, hostage of promis'd weal,
Breakfast of love. But lo! lo, where she is.
Cease we to praise; now pray we for a kiss.


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Poem Submitted: Monday, April 12, 2010



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