William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet Lvii

Poem by William Shakespeare

Being your slave, what should I do but tend
Upon the hours and times of your desire?
I have no precious time at all to spend,
Nor services to do, till you require.
Nor dare I chide the world-without-end hour
Whilst I, my sovereign, watch the clock for you,
Nor think the bitterness of absence sour
When you have bid your servant once adieu;
Nor dare I question with my jealous thought
Where you may be, or your affairs suppose,
But, like a sad slave, stay and think of nought
Save, where you are how happy you make those.
So true a fool is love that in your will,
Though you do any thing, he thinks no ill.


Comments about Sonnet Lvii by William Shakespeare

  • Dr Tony BrahminDr Tony Brahmin (3/6/2020 10:51:00 PM)

    Nor dare I question with my jealous thought
    Where you may be, or your affairs suppose,
    But, like a sad slave, stay and think of nought... very fine poem. tony(Report)Reply

    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Brian JaniBrian Jani (4/26/2014 10:37:00 AM)

    Awesome I like this poem, check mine out(Report)Reply

    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
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Read poems about / on: sad, happy, world, time, sonnet



Poem Submitted: Monday, May 21, 2001

Poem Edited: Monday, May 21, 2001


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