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Tuesday, December 31, 2002

Sonnet Lxxii

Rating: 5.0
O, lest the world should task you to recite
What merit lived in me, that you should love
After my death, dear love, forget me quite,
For you in me can nothing worthy prove;
Unless you would devise some virtuous lie,
To do more for me than mine own desert,
And hang more praise upon deceased I
Than niggard truth would willingly impart:
O, lest your true love may seem false in this,
That you for love speak well of me untrue,
My name be buried where my body is,
And live no more to shame nor me nor you.
For I am shamed by that which I bring forth,
And so should you, to love things nothing worth.
William Shakespeare
COMMENTS
Dr Antony Theodore 15 October 2019
What merit lived in me, that you should love After my death, dear love, forget me quite, thinking that touches the heart. tony
0 0 Reply
Brian Jani 26 April 2014
Awesome I like this poem, check mine out
0 2 Reply

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