Sir Philip Sidney

(1554 - 1586 / Kent / England)

Sonnet Xxvi: Though Dusty Wits - Poem by Sir Philip Sidney

Though dusty wits dare scorn astrology,
And fools can think those lamps of purest light
Whose numbers, ways, greatness, eternity,
Promising wonders, wonder do invite,

To have for no cause birthright in the sky,
But for to spangle the black weeds of night:
Or for some brawl, which in that chamber high,
They should still dance to please a gazer's sight;

For me, I do Nature unidle know,
And know great causes, great effects procure:
And know those bodies high reign on the low.

And if these rules did fail, proof makes me sure,
Who oft fore-judge my after-following race,
By only those two stars in Stella's face.


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Read poems about / on: dance, nature, sky, light, night, sonnet, star



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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