William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet Xxxv - Poem by William Shakespeare

No more be grieved at that which thou hast done:
Roses have thorns, and silver fountains mud;
Clouds and eclipses stain both moon and sun,
And loathsome canker lives in sweetest bud.
All men make faults, and even I in this,
Authorizing thy trespass with compare,
Myself corrupting, salving thy amiss,
Excusing thy sins more than thy sins are;
For to thy sensual fault I bring in sense--
Thy adverse party is thy advocate--
And 'gainst myself a lawful plea commence:
Such civil war is in my love and hate
That I an accessary needs must be
To that sweet thief which sourly robs from me.


Comments about Sonnet Xxxv by William Shakespeare

  • Brian Jani (4/26/2014 3:48:00 PM)


    Awesome I like this poem, check mine out  (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: hate, silver, war, moon, sun, sonnet, rose



Poem Submitted: Monday, May 21, 2001

Poem Edited: Monday, May 21, 2001


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