R.K. Cowles

Rookie - 0 Points (12/31/1968 / hudson falls, new york)

Sweet Patootie [1920's Slang Poem] - Poem by R.K. Cowles

Just prior of exiting my apartment

This baby grand shoved coal

Down the building's coal chute


Through the coal hole

Thought I ought to head to the barbershop

On foot and leave the flivver at home

Because my journey's not far

Need to get my mane snipped and a shoe shine

And will spill with my pal about

What each of us has captured on film

Before that, will pick up today's gazette at the corner newstand

Out from one of the third story's window

I heard from a Victrola playing

A new vinyl from a canary

Titled: 'Wild Women Don't Have the Blues'

She's one of those bearcats with a spit curl

Curled upon her cheeks

Wearing those various stoles she's famous for

And those turbans and tams

I continue on

While passing the corner drugstore

I came upon two vamps I'm acquanted with

They'd request my presence later on

At a new club for this hip new trio

I thought I should, with all this hype

That's going around town lately

Although a bit indecisive

from the last musical ensemble

That performed there

Although I hate to razz

I do deserve to beef

With the whisper sister there

Should have known better to schedual a gig

With a musical combo called Flash Dough Kissers

The one with the squeak box

Sounded like fingernails scrapping across a chalkboard

And that chirp that couldn't croon

They ruined 'I Wish I Could Shimmy Like My Sister Kate'

Their version was piffle

It'll bring down this fine palace

That reminds me

Need to find out where a pal is performing

The one that dresses like a drugstore cowboy

With his pal on his skins beating it out

This duo always hit on the six

Neither one is less than butterfly boots

Even, that night, the dancers who were shimmying

Seemed to be heelers

All were floorflushing it

Generally an oliver twist or two hoof the floor

All I could do was guzzle foam in the back with

A trio that audiences would be blowing their wigs for

When they jam anywheres

Before I arrive to the sandwich shop

With a sign that reads bank's closed

To chat with this sweet patootie

Many men are goofy about

Never fazed by most anything

She'll rejuvinate your spirits

With any encounter with her

I had pass the new advertisement on main

In the theatre's window

Of a new play by Joseph Kesselring

'Arsenic and Old Lace'

Starring that hot dawg actress that I'm neighbor's with

Then an oil merchant approaches me

Anticipating all the rubes I have in my kick

He better lay off me

And not fritter his time, I'm no sap

As I ankle along to my next stop

I see a wire ready to rause my friend

With a shade nearby

Had to stop, make myself known

Show these grifters

I have my boot on at what's happening

I finally arrive

Thought I'd spare this sweet patootie this awkward conversation

She's having with this upstage chewing his gums

About who knows what

Wearing a derby and a chesterfield coat

I can acknowledge this upstage

Would be a flat tire for any Jane

I give her a hug and order

And commence a more comfortable conversation

She ought to be having

Each of us with some noodle juice


Poet's Notes about The Poem

This appears in my book 'Slang Poetry Volume I' on lulu.com

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Poem Submitted: Wednesday, January 4, 2012

Poem Edited: Monday, April 1, 2013


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