Emily Dickinson

(10 December 1830 – 15 May 1886 / Amherst / Massachusetts)

The Chariot - Poem by Emily Dickinson

Because I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;
The carriage held but just ourselves
And Immortality.

We slowly drove, he knew no haste,
And I had put away
My labor, and my leisure too,
For his civility.

We passed the school where children played,
Their lessons scarcely done;
We passed the fields of gazing grain,
We passed the setting sun.

We paused before a house that seemed
A swelling of the ground;
The roof was scarcely visible.
The cornice but a mound.

Since then 'tis centuries; but each
Feels shorter than the day
I first surmised the horses' heads
Were toward eternity.


Comments about The Chariot by Emily Dickinson

  • Juan Olivarez (4/28/2011 9:38:00 AM)

    I believe it is significant that children are so prominent in this poem. Emily Dickinson being a recluse from life still had time to pass out candy to the neighborhood children. ' The Lady In White' was a great poetess, one of the best in American literature. (Report)Reply

    (3/26/2018 8:26:00 PM)

    Thank you for that fact. Very interesting

    3 person liked.
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Poem Submitted: Thursday, April 28, 2011

Poem Edited: Thursday, April 28, 2011


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