Rudyard Kipling

(30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936 / Bombay)

The Deep-Sea Cables - Poem by Rudyard Kipling

The wrecks dissolve above us; their dust drops down from afar --
Down to the dark, to the utter dark, where the blind white sea-snakes are.
There is no sound, no echo of sound, in the deserts of the deep,
Or the great gray level plains of ooze where the shell-burred cables creep.

Here in the womb of the world -- here on the tie-ribs of earth
Words, and the words of men, flicker and flutter and beat --
Warning, sorrow and gain, salutation and mirth --
For a Power troubles the Still that has neither voice nor feet.

They have wakened the timeless Things; they have killed their father Time;
Joining hands in the gloom, a league from the last of the sun.
Hush! Men talk to-day o'er the waste of the ultimate slime,
And a new Word runs between: whispering, "Let us be one!"


Comments about The Deep-Sea Cables by Rudyard Kipling

  • Brian Jani (7/14/2014 5:22:00 AM)


    Mr kipling had a distinct signature style of writing his poetry and this one is just on point and well planned. (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: warning, sorrow, dark, father, power, sea, sun, world, time, snake, running



Poem Submitted: Tuesday, December 31, 2002



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