Edith Nesbit

(15 August 1858 – 4 May 1924 / Kennington / Surrey / England)

The Goose-Girl - Poem by Edith Nesbit

I WANDERED lonely by the sea,
As is my daily use,
I saw her drive across the lea
The gander and the goose.
The gander and the gray, gray goose,
She drove them all together;
Her cheeks were rose, her gold hair loose,
All in the wild gray weather.


'O dainty maid who drive the geese
Across the common wide,
Turn, turn your pretty back on these
And come and be my bride.


I am a poet from the town,
And, 'mid the ladies there,
There is not one would wear a crown
With half your charming air!'


She laughed, she shook her pretty head.
'I want no poet's hand;
Go read your fairy-books,' she said,
'For this is fairy-land.
My Prince comes riding o'er the leas;
He fitly comes to woo,
For I'm a Princess, and my geese
Were poets, once, like you!'


Comments about The Goose-Girl by Edith Nesbit

  • Brian Jani (6/28/2014 5:48:00 PM)


    this is classic.well done and i look forward to reading more of your poems (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Monday, April 19, 2010



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