Dorothy Parker

(22 August 1893 - 7 June 1967 / Long Branch / New Jersey)

The Immortals - Poem by Dorothy Parker

If you should sail for Trebizond, or die,
Or cry another name in your first sleep,
Or see me board a train, and fail to sigh,
Appropriately, I'd clutch my breast and weep.
And you, if I should wander through the door,
Or sin, or seek a nunnery, or save
My lips and give my cheek, would tread the floor
And aptly mention poison and the grave.

Therefore the mooning world is gratified,
Quoting how prettily we sigh and swear;
And you and I, correctly side by side,
Shall live as lovers when our bones are bare
And though we lie forever enemies,
Shall rank with Abelard and Heloise.


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Read poems about / on: sleep, world



Poem Submitted: Monday, January 13, 2003



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