Dana Gioia

(24 December 1950 / Hawthorne, California)

The Lost Garden - Poem by Dana Gioia

If ever we see those gardens again,
The summer will be gone—at least our summer.
Some other mockingbird will concertize
Among the mulberries, and other vines
Will climb the high brick wall to disappear.

How many footpaths crossed the old estate—
The gracious acreage of a grander age—
So many trees to kiss or argue under,
And greenery enough for any mood.
What pleasure to be sad in such surroundings.

At least in retrospect. For even sorrow
Seems bearable when studied at a distance,
And if we speak of private suffering,
The pain becomes part of a well-turned tale
Describing someone else who shares our name.

Still, thinking of you, I sometimes play a game.
What if we had walked a different path one day,
Would some small incident have nudged us elsewhere
The way a pebble tossed into a brook
Might change the course a hundred miles downstream?

The trick is making memory a blessing,
To learn by loss the cool subtraction of desire,
Of wanting nothing more than what has been,
To know the past forever lost, yet seeing
Behind the wall a garden still in blossom.


Comments about The Lost Garden by Dana Gioia

  • Adeline Foster (1/8/2016 11:40:00 AM)


    Like it. Read mine - Brush Strokes -
    Adeline Foster
    (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Tuesday, December 20, 2011

Poem Edited: Tuesday, December 20, 2011


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