John Keats

(31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821 / London, England)

Where's The Poet? - Poem by John Keats

Where's the Poet? show him! show him,
Muses nine! that I may know him.
'Tis the man who with a man
Is an equal, be he King,
Or poorest of the beggar-clan
Or any other wonderous thing
A man may be 'twixt ape and Plato;
'Tis the man who with a bird,
Wren or Eagle, finds his way to
All its instincts; he hath heard
The Lion's roaring, and can tell
What his horny throat expresseth,
And to him the Tiger's yell
Come articulate and presseth
Or his ear like mother-tongue.


Comments about Where's The Poet? by John Keats

  • Frederick Kesner (3/7/2018 4:54:00 AM)


    The poet is where poetic-chlorians (i.e. poetic 'midi-chlorians) that reside in every human being; they drive language and articulated emotion, that are experienced with certain cultural flavours accents as would we in non-poetic language use. Perhaps. Just a thought.: _) (Report) Reply

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  • Sylvaonyema Uba (2/14/2017 10:35:00 AM)


    All its instincts...

    Thanks for sharing this poem.

    Sylva
    (Report) Reply

  • (4/30/2009 6:29:00 PM)


    A light hearted side of Keats I like...I found the poet, in the man, love the references, a Taigress and a mother (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: tiger, mother



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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