Langston Hughes

(1 February 1902 – 22 May 1967 / Missouri)

Will V-Day Be Me-Day Too? - Poem by Langston Hughes

Over There,
World War II.

Dear Fellow Americans,
I write this letter
Hoping times will be better
When this war
Is through.
I'm a Tan-skinned Yank
Driving a tank.
I ask, WILL V-DAY
BE ME-DAY, TOO?

I wear a U. S. uniform.
I've done the enemy much harm,
I've driven back
The Germans and the Japs,
From Burma to the Rhine.
On every battle line,
I've dropped defeat
Into the Fascists' laps.

I am a Negro American
Out to defend my land
Army, Navy, Air Corps--
I am there.
I take munitions through,
I fight--or stevedore, too.
I face death the same as you do
Everywhere.

I've seen my buddy lying
Where he fell.
I've watched him dying
I promised him that I would try
To make our land a land
Where his son could be a man--
And there'd be no Jim Crow birds
Left in our sky.

So this is what I want to know:
When we see Victory's glow,
Will you still let old Jim Crow
Hold me back?
When all those foreign folks who've waited--
Italians, Chinese, Danes--are liberated.
Will I still be ill-fated
Because I'm black?

Here in my own, my native land,
Will the Jim Crow laws still stand?
Will Dixie lynch me still
When I return?
Or will you comrades in arms
From the factories and the farms,
Have learned what this war
Was fought for us to learn?

When I take off my uniform,
Will I be safe from harm--
Or will you do me
As the Germans did the Jews?
When I've helped this world to save,
Shall I still be color's slave?
Or will Victory change
Your antiquated views?

You can't say I didn't fight
To smash the Fascists' might.
You can't say I wasn't with you
in each battle.
As a soldier, and a friend.
When this war comes to an end,
Will you herd me in a Jim Crow car
Like cattle?

Or will you stand up like a man
At home and take your stand
For Democracy?
That's all I ask of you.
When we lay the guns away
To celebrate
Our Victory Day
WILL V-DAY BE ME-DAY, TOO?
That's what I want to know.

Sincerely,
GI Joe.


Comments about Will V-Day Be Me-Day Too? by Langston Hughes

  • (6/26/2018 3:12:00 PM)

    wow, Heidi you are right we're dopes (Report) Reply

    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Kevin Taylor (3/7/2018 10:20:00 PM)

    Not an American, but if it didn't start here the day before this was written, the day of, the day after, tomorrow- today. (Report) Reply

  • (10/23/2007 11:47:00 AM)

    Sadly, this was the great and terrible irony of WWII. While we fought against fascism in Europe and Asia, African-americans were still facing segregation and Japanese-Americans, whose sons also went to war, lived in internment camps surrounded by barbed wire and guard towers. An african-american soldier in uniform was shot and killed because he didn't sit in the back of the bus. African-american defense workers weren't allowed to learn skilled jobs or become foremen or supervisors. Classic American policy of talking out of both sides of their mouths. Or, do as I say, not as I do. (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: war, soldier, car, son, change, friend, world, home, sky, death, hope



Poem Submitted: Monday, January 20, 2003



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