William Allingham

Rating: 5
Rating: 5

William Allingham Biography

He was born in Ballyshannon, Co. Donegal, Ireland, and was the son of the manager of a local bank who was of English descent. He obtained a post in the custom-house of his native town and held several similar posts in Ireland and England until 1870, when he had retired from the service, and became sub-editor of Fraser's Magazine, which he edited from 1874 to 1879, in succession to James Froude. He had published a volume of Poems in 1850, followed by Day and Night Songs, a volume containing many charming lyrics, in 1855.

Allingham was on terms of close friendship with DG Rossetti, who contributed to the illustration of the Songs. His Letters to Allingham (1854-1870) were edited by Dr. Birkbeck Hill in 1897. Lawrence Bloomfield in Ireland, his most ambitious, though not his most successf ...

William Allingham Comments

Vandan bisht 25 February 2018

I Love poems birdie, will you pet

2 2 Reply
ima guy 28 February 2018

hes alright BLAH BLUH LA

0 4 Reply
Divyanshi 21 May 2018

I like poem birdie will you pet

0 2 Reply
Ayushi 02 June 2018

I like the poem Birdie , will you pet

0 2 Reply
Ayanni 12 November 2017

I love your poems

1 1 Reply
KILL ME 17 November 2021

AMAZING

0 0 Reply
Spencer Reid 22 January 2020

Even I can't analyze these poems, and thats saying something

2 1 Reply

why is there a festival based around this guy his poems are awful, there is no substance to anything he writes

2 1 Reply
Nihal Shankar 18 July 2018

I like the the poem Birdie, will you pet

1 2 Reply
Anushka modi 10 June 2018

I like the peom birdie will u pet

0 2 Reply

The Best Poem Of William Allingham

The Fairies

Up the airy mountain,
Down the rushy glen,
We daren't go a-hunting
For fear of little men;
Wee folk, good folk,
Trooping all together;
Green jacket, red cap,
And white owl's feather!

Down along the rocky shore
Some make their home,
They live on crispy pancakes
Of yellow tide-foam;
Some in the reeds
Of the black mountain lake,
With frogs for their watch-dogs,
All night awake.

High on the hill-top
The old King sits;
He is now so old and gray
He's nigh lost his wits.
With a bridge of white mist
Columbkill he crosses,
On his stately journeys
From Slieveleague to Rosses;
Or going up with music
On cold starry nights
To sup with the Queen
Of the gay Northern Lights.

They stole little Bridget
For seven years long;
When she came down again
Her friends were all gone.
They took her lightly back,
Between the night and morrow,
They thought that she was fast asleep,
But she was dead with sorrow.
They have kept her ever since
Deep within the lake,
On a bed of flag-leaves,
Watching till she wake.

By the craggy hill-side,
Through the mosses bare,
They have planted thorn-trees
For pleasure here and there.
If any man so daring
As dig them up in spite,
He shall find their sharpest thorns
In his bed at night.

Up the airy mountain,
Down the rushy glen,
We daren't go a-hunting
For fear of little men;
Wee folk, good folk,
Trooping all together;
Green jacket, red cap,
And white owl's feather!

William Allingham Popularity

William Allingham Quotes

11 November 2014

History of Ireland—lawlessness and turbulency, robbery and oppression, hatred and revenge, blind selfishness everywhere—no principle, no heroism. What can be done with it?

William Allingham Popularity

BEST POETS
Close
Error Success