Chukwuma Ndububa


Exiled - Poem by Chukwuma Ndububa

This lifeless vale of lying bones and skulls
houses no one, or days that we have had
but shall have us in court as the sort calls.

It is the grim reaper's with a large scythe,
argus-eyed, clothed in a black cloak, with
a hood; although many painters say lithe.

Empty gourds with a parrot's egg in each,
he would open, snipping a thread. I bruit,
this bridge of asses widely borne eldritch.

Now, promise me that you will be alright.
'tis, here, walking the path over the orbs
with limbs flung wide as in a windy flight.

Ay! It is a toy horse caused to come forth;
so, stretched out to view. For a name it is,
too, upon potsherds or shells effaced not.

Free from the open life and held endwise
in lack of ease; a discharge without dues
earned for the airies and fell Lord of flies,

Lower me in the depth the grave did cast
beneath your breast to envelop my case;
hereupon, you will get whole at long last.

As for the ill hoe and spade that inhume,
and this disc of the moon across the blue,
fly at the thewy wings of his foul broom.

Topic(s) of this poem: Absence


Comments about Exiled by Chukwuma Ndububa

  • Pamela Sinicrope (5/28/2016 9:26:00 AM)


    This is such an interesting poem! I've read through it 3-4 times to get a better understanding of it. Visually, it is written in a traditional format (basically 10 syllables in all but one line) , giving the reading a flowing meter. Secondly, there is the visual imagery. Very powerful stuff. The speaker invokes the grim reaper overlooking a pile of bones. In my mind, I imagine an open mass grave, and the speaker is one of the bodies. The writing scatters images, feelings, and emotions related to murder and death in a war-torn country. I agree with Simone that the writing portrays a sort of horrific landscape painting that is alive. This is really well written and I applaud the writer. I was not aware that this was poem of the day, but it is clearly worthy. I saw your comment on Simone's page and decided to check out your poetry. Glad I did. I'll save this poem. Thank you for sharing your work. (Report) Reply

    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Simone Inez Harriman (5/4/2016 3:20:00 PM)


    I see this type of poem to be like a 'Salvador Dali' type of expression that....... 'By stripping ordinary objects of their normal function, Surrealist artists aimed to expose psychological truth and as a result created abstract images in order to evoke empathy from the viewer. Highly individualized, the movement relied heavily on the element of the unexpected, borrowed from various Dadaist techniques and eventually came to represent the alienation many experienced in the wake of a war stricken world...' (Mamta Bhatt)

    In fairness I do love poems which use rich metaphors that may appear to be in a nonsense context yet give rich meaningful images.
    (Report) Reply

  • Akachukwu Lekwauwa (5/4/2016 10:09:00 AM)


    congratulations to the poet behind the poem on being selected for member poem of the day (Report) Reply

  • Edward Kofi Louis (5/4/2016 2:50:00 AM)


    Clothed in a black cloak! Thanks for sharing this poem with us. (Report) Reply

  • Mike Smith (5/4/2016 12:58:00 AM)


    Just wondering how a poem like this gets poem of the day? It's rated as a 1 out of 10. The author only had 4 other poems on the site, none of which are rated or commented on... And maybe I'm just dull, but I can't draw any real meaning from this poem no matter how hard I try. Also, the author hasn't posted in well over a year
    ...
    (Report) Reply

    Jasbir Chatterjee Jasbir Chatterjee (5/4/2016 5:14:00 AM)

    I agree with you Mike! This poem doesn't convey much sense to me and I wonder how PH makes its selections for daily Poems of the day.

  • Tirtho Banerjee (5/4/2016 12:23:00 AM)


    esoteric piece of work (Report) Reply

  • Kelly Kurt (4/1/2015 2:09:00 PM)


    A personal and heart felt work, Chukwuma. Thank you for sharing. (Report) Reply

  • Georgios Venetopoulos (9/17/2014 4:12:00 PM)


    I do not understand your write, sir. (Report) Reply

  • Edward Kofi Louis (9/2/2014 12:43:00 AM)


    A nice piece of work. Thanks for sharing this poem with us.

    E.K.L:
    (Report) Reply

Read all 10 comments »



Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags


Poem Submitted: Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Poem Edited: Sunday, June 15, 2014


[Report Error]