William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet 128: How Oft, When Thou, My Music, Music Play'st - Poem by William Shakespeare

How oft, when thou, my music, music play'st,
Upon that blessèd wood whose motion sounds
With thy sweet fingers when thou gently sway'st
The wiry concord that mine ear confounds,
Do I envy those jacks that nimble leap
To kiss the tender inward of thy hand,
Whilst my poor lips, which should that harvest reap,
At the wood's boldness by thee blushing stand!
To be so tickled, they would change their state
And situation with those dancing chips
O'er whom thy fingers walk with gentle gait,
Making dead wood more blest than living lips.
Since saucy jacks so happy are in this,
Give them thy fingers, me thy lips to kiss.


Comments about Sonnet 128: How Oft, When Thou, My Music, Music Play'st by William Shakespeare

  • Gold Star - 30,424 Points Gangadharan Nair Pulingat (3/2/2015 1:56:00 AM)

    The great poem that I liked so much. (Report) Reply

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  • Gold Star - 17,505 Points Edward Kofi Louis (2/25/2015 7:52:00 AM)

    Nice piece of work. Thanks for sharing this poem with us.

    E.K.L. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 178 Points Brian Jani (4/26/2014 5:41:00 AM)

    Awesome I like this poem, check mine out (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: music, kiss, change, happy, sonnet, dance



Poem Submitted: Monday, January 13, 2003



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