john tiong chunghoo

Gold Star - 5,668 Points (Jan 21,1960 / Sibu, Sarawak, Borneo East Malaysia)

Butterflies - Poem by john tiong chunghoo

women are like butterflies
dad always said
when he was alive
oh how true that is

mom, sisters, aunties,
they are all butterflies
with colourful stories
to tell of their love
and alluring attire
as they dance out
the steps of life

fly in and out of days
gathering memories
golden, sweet, light
and fluid as honey

kisses, presents, flowers and all
cupboards full of cotton, silk, crepe,
lace, and what have you?
a million shades and styles
to draw on life

you could see them
flutter into dreams
where roses, orchids,
crocuses, hibiscus
magnolias, scent
the way of paradise

each twirls, swirls, twists,
waltzes, discos, pirouettes
through that memory lane
where diversity and thirst for
life lifts them from bloom to bloom

where a million years might
have passed and one will
still be digging in to feed on
those joy capsuled moments
though they are fleeting
as worms that morph
into lavae, butterflies
and rainbow

big sister loves her
graceful skirt in that shade
passionate as rosy red

second sister's
favourite blouse
innocent as lily white

third sister's lace
covered night gown
makes her look a real ballerina
ever ready to fly the way of
butterfly

to talk about butterflies
snappy dad was correct when
he said women are like butterflies
they fly into your life
bringing colours and sweetness
if you know where to look for
the right ones

open the window of your heart wide
and you see them flutter, flap, dance
in so many ways into your life

inspired by

Annabel Lee

It was many and many a year ago,
In a kingdom by the sea,
That a maiden there lived whom you may know
By the name of ANNABEL LEE;
And this maiden she lived with no other thought
Than to love and be loved by me.

I was a child and she was a child,
In this kingdom by the sea;
But we loved with a love that was more than love-
I and my Annabel Lee;
With a love that the winged seraphs of heaven
Coveted her and me.

And this was the reason that, long ago,
In this kingdom by the sea,
A wind blew out of a cloud, chilling
My beautiful Annabel Lee;
So that her highborn kinsman came
And bore her away from me,
To shut her up in a sepulchre
In this kingdom by the sea.

The angels, not half so happy in heaven,
Went envying her and me-
Yes! - that was the reason (as all men know,
In this kingdom by the sea)
That the wind came out of the cloud by night,
Chilling and killing my Annabel Lee.

But our love it was stronger by far than the love
Of those who were older than we-
Of many far wiser than we-
And neither the angels in heaven above,
Nor the demons down under the sea,
Can ever dissever my soul from the soul
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee.

For the moon never beams without bringing me dreams
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;
And the stars never rise but I feel the bright eyes
Of the beautiful Annabel Lee;
And so, all the night-tide, I lie down by the side
Of my darling- my darling- my life and my bride,
In the sepulchre there by the sea,
In her tomb by the sounding sea.

Edgar Allan Poe #31


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Read poems about / on: sister, beautiful, sea, women, mom, heaven, child, wind, memory, night, happy, moon, red, dream, love, sky, life, butterfly, angel, woman



Poem Submitted: Saturday, March 26, 2005

Poem Edited: Thursday, April 10, 2008


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