Gargoyle Poem by Daniel Y.

Gargoyle



The gargoyle frowned with his permanent face
and scuffed at the birds perched on his carapace
Even more he despised the humans below
causing a ruckus and a clamorous row.
The ‘trusses beneath him, rose from the ground.
His duty to hold back the demon hound.
The bell tol’d them all the time
as another man died right on nine.
And no one noticed the stony, grey smirk
of the bat winged pillar on the corner of Kirk.

COMMENTS OF THE POEM
Daniel Brick 17 June 2014

This poem is really complete - and compact. Not a wasted word. And what a vivid portrayal of an alien intelligence, one with no understanding of creatures of flesh and blood. Of course, that cuts both ways because we have no understanding of his stone-based life. That's one dimension of this poem: it reveals to us the limitations of our sympathies toward other possible beings. Make that - our lack of sympathies. So the poem carries that moral lesson. But its strength lies in the objective creation of another kind of being, one which shares our world without our knowing it.

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Adeline Foster 04 March 2014

Fascinating poem. I loved it but wished to know more about the - bat winged pillar on the corner of Kirk- And now about An Emily Dickinson Theory… What ever made you think that I was trying to write like Emily Dickinson? It is, as the title says, about poets including Emily, a theory only. Style or wording has no connection to her, it is just my own conjecture on what makes poets tick. Adeline

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Daniel Brick 14 February 2014

This poem is an arrow hitting the center of the target. Your description of the gargoyle's permanent face is inspired, it reminds us the gargoyle is carved from stone but also shows it cannot change its negative attitudes to everything from birds to the fates of men - its attitudes like its face are permanent. There's the feeling of a lot of space in this poem: from the human events way down on the ground and then swooping up to the roof from which the gargoyle observes things with unfeeling eyes. This poem is just as long as it has to be!

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