African Poems

Kwesi Brew (The Excutioner's Dream)

I dreamt I saw an eye, a pretty eye,

In your hands,

Glittering, wet and sickening;

Like a dull onyx set in a crown of throns,

I did not know you were dead

when you dropped it in my lap.

what horrors of human sacrifice

Have you seen, executioner?

What agonies of tortured men

Who sat through nights and nights of pain;

Tongue tied by the wicked sappor;

Gazing at you with hot imploring eyes?

These white lilies tossed their little heads

then In the moon-steeped ponds;

There was bouncing gaiety in the crisp chirping

Of the cricket in the undergrowth,

And as the surf-boats splintered the waves

I saw the rainbow in your eyes

And the flash of your teeth;

As each crystal shone,

I saw sitting hand in hand with melancholy

A little sunny child

Playing at marbles with husks of fallen stars,

Horrors were your flowers then, the bright red bougainvilled.

They delighted you.

Why do you now weep

And offer me this little gift

Of a dull onyx set in a crown of throns?

Poem Submitted: Wednesday, March 27, 2013

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Comments about Kwesi Brew (The Excutioner's Dream) by African Poems

  • Edward Kofi LouisEdward Kofi Louis (4/30/2019 2:53:00 PM)

    Tongue tied by the wicked sappor! !


    Thanks for sharing this poem with us.

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  • benneth ihia (6/10/2018 3:07:00 PM)

    What's the theme, devices, summary and conclusion of this poem

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  • Ken E Hall (6/1/2013 2:36:00 AM)

    A different and original look at the 'Excutioner's Dream' and the way you pass thru the poem leaving the reader to pass their own ideas of the poem...regards

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