Henry Van Dyke

(10 November 1852 – 10 April 1933 / Germantown, Pennsylvania)

Robert Browning - Poem by Henry Van Dyke

How blind the toil that burrows like the mole,
In winding graveyard pathways underground,
For Browning's lineage! What if men have found
Poor footmen or rich merchants on the roll
Of his forbears? Did they beget his soul?
Nay, for he came of ancestry renowned
Through all the world, -- the poets laurel-crowned
With wreaths from which the autumn takes no toll.

The blazons on his coat-of-arms are these:
The flaming sign of Shelley's heart on fire,
The golden globe of Shakespeare's human stage,
The staff and scrip of Chaucer's pilgrimage,
The rose of Dante's deep, divine desire,
The tragic mask of wise Euripides.


Comments about Robert Browning by Henry Van Dyke

  • (11/3/2009 12:17:00 AM)


    Absolutely stunning! Brilliant, impeccable! Here's a rare example of form and idea blended into perfection. Wow! ! ! (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: autumn, rose, fire, world, heart, wind



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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