William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet Xlvi - Poem by William Shakespeare

Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war
How to divide the conquest of thy sight;
Mine eye my heart thy picture's sight would bar,
My heart mine eye the freedom of that right.
My heart doth plead that thou in him dost lie--
A closet never pierced with crystal eyes--
But the defendant doth that plea deny
And says in him thy fair appearance lies.
To 'cide this title is impanneled
A quest of thoughts, all tenants to the heart,
And by their verdict is determined
The clear eye's moiety and the dear heart's part:
As thus; mine eye's due is thy outward part,
And my heart's right thy inward love of heart.


Comments about Sonnet Xlvi by William Shakespeare

  • (9/17/2015 10:16:00 PM)


    ....an imaginative write, and nicely penned ★ (Report) Reply

    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Brian Jani (4/26/2014 3:04:00 PM)


    Awesome I like this poem, check mine out  (Report) Reply

Read all 2 comments »



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Read poems about / on: freedom, war, heart, sonnet



Poem Submitted: Monday, May 21, 2001

Poem Edited: Monday, May 21, 2001


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