Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

(28 August 1749 – 22 March 1832 / Frankfurt am Main)

The Christmas-Box - Poem by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

THIS box, mine own sweet darling, thou wilt find
With many a varied sweetmeat's form supplied;
The fruits are they of holy Christmas tide,
But baked indeed, for children's use design'd.
I'd fain, in speeches sweet with skill combin'd,
Poetic sweetmeats for the feast provide;
But why in such frivolities confide?
Perish the thought, with flattery to blind!
One sweet thing there is still, that from within,
Within us speaks,--that may be felt afar;
This may be wafted o'er to thee alone.
If thou a recollection fond canst win,
As if with pleasure gleam'd each well-known star,
The smallest gift thou never wilt disown.


Comments about The Christmas-Box by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

  • (12/11/2017 6:38:00 PM)


    I would like to understand the true meaning behind this poem as I am not able to understand old English well. First of all, is the poem directed to his love interest? Any old English translation to the modern English would be appreciated. (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: christmas, star, children, alone, child



Poem Submitted: Thursday, January 1, 2004



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