Count Giacomo Leopardi

(29 June 1798 – 14 June 1837 / Rencanati)

To Himself - Poem by Count Giacomo Leopardi

Nor wilt thou rest forever, weary heart.
The last illusion is destroyed,
That I eternal thought. Destroyed!
I feel all hope and all desire depart,
For life and its deceitful joys.
Forever rest! Enough! Thy throbbings cease!
Naught can requite thy miseries;
Nor is earth worthy of thy sighs.
Life is a bitter, weary load,
The world a slough. And now, repose!
Despair no more, but find in Death
The only boon Fate on our race bestows!
Still, Nature, art thou doomed to fall,
The victim scorned of that blind, brutal power
That rules and ruins all.


Comments about To Himself by Count Giacomo Leopardi

  • Fabrizio Frosini (1/4/2016 7:28:00 AM)


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    Leopardi hated Recanati and made several unsuccessful attempts to leave the village. In 1822, Leopardi got a chance to escape to Rome which was an immense disappointment since he was unable to find a suitable job due to his physical disabilities. Giacomo returned home and later travelled around Italy. Love struck him in Florence and this fruitless affair gave birth to some of his most grief-stricken poetry.
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Poem Submitted: Saturday, April 10, 2010



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