Richard Lovelace

(1618-1657 / London / England)

To His Deare Brother Colonel F. L. Immoderately Mourning My Brothers Untimely Death At Carmarthen - Poem by Richard Lovelace

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I.
If teares could wash the ill away,
A pearle for each wet bead I'd pay;
But as dew'd corne the fuller growes,
So water'd eyes but swell our woes.

II.
One drop another cals, which still
(Griefe adding fuell) doth distill;
Too fruitfull of her selfe is anguish,
We need no cherishing to languish.

III.
Coward fate degen'rate man
Like little children uses, when
He whips us first, untill we weepe,
Then, 'cause we still a weeping keepe.

IV.
Then from thy firme selfe never swerve;
Teares fat the griefe that they should sterve;
Iron decrees of destinie
Are ner'e wipe't out with a wet eye.

V.
But this way you may gaine the field,
Oppose but sorrow, and 'twill yield;
One gallant thorough-made resolve
Doth starry influence dissolve.


Comments about To His Deare Brother Colonel F. L. Immoderately Mourning My Brothers Untimely Death At Carmarthen by Richard Lovelace

  • (7/21/2009 1:31:00 PM)


    thats complicated man, (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: fate, sorrow, children, water, brother, death, child



Poem Submitted: Tuesday, December 31, 2002



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