Abu at-Tayyib al-Mutanabbi

Abu at-Tayyib al-Mutanabbi Poems

Courage to reason second place must take.
For valour should not balanced judgment shake.
...

Strong resolves come in proportion to men of determination,
and noble deeds come in proportion to magnanimous men.
...

My heart is aflame, burning with love for you
While your heart is frigid-cold toward me
...

Beautiful women, as experienced men know,
Are but darkness wrapped in dazzling light aglow.
...

A young soul in my ageing body plays,
Though time's sharp blades my weary visage raze.
...

Resolutions are measured against those who make them; generosity in accordance with the giver.
Littleness is magnified by small men, while grandeur is deprecated by the great.
Sayf al-Dawla imposes upon the army his will, yet seasoned armies cannot achieve it.
He asks from men all that he has in himself, though even lions would not claim to match that.
...

Night fell; your favor never falls, your sight's
more suited to the eye than being shut
...

Dark is the day before it's seen; an adjective's
untrue until it's verified by sight, & since
...

Behold a rosy lion! when seeking out a lake to drink
His roar resounds as far as the Euphrates and the Nile River
...

Cowards see vapid impotence as sense,
Such is treacherous villainy's defense.
...

Sleepless over sleepless I had life dramatically
My pains increase and my eyes shed tears periodically.
The hardship of ardent love hurts me extremely.
Only sleepless eye remains and poor heart throbs constantly.
...

Defiantly live, or in honour die,
Midst slashing blades and banners flapping high
...

My tear responds, but the inviter is only the resound of ruin appealing.
Hearing the inviter, my eyes shed tears before camels' caravan marching.
I sat between my fellows occupying on my tears wiping.
Yet the tears continuously shedding within excuses or blaming.
...

so that what was held equaled what remained without:

it grew to overflow my flesh, turning
...

O, ruin how many time had I cried nearby thy location.
You was about to cry sympathetically with my affliction
I hope nice-morning covers the place since it has revived my rapture.
...

When my hands from brimming cups weakly shook,
I awoke, ere sense my wined mind forsook.
...

Shoreless you would be of you were a sea.
If rain, earth unable to contain ye,
...

Misfortune's arrows do upon me rain.
Countless arrowheads does my heart sustain.
...

Though a noble lady and highly born
‘Tis your unfeminine wisdom we mourn
...

Grave harm have lovers to themselves done,
Loving, ere understanding life begun,
...

Abu at-Tayyib al-Mutanabbi Biography

Abu at-Tayyib Ahmad ibn al-Husayn al-Mutanabbi (Arabic: أبو الطيب أحمد بن الحسين المتنبّي Abū aṭ-Ṭayyib ʾAḥmad ibn al-Ḥusayn al-Mutanabbī‎) (915 – 23 September 965) was an Arab Iraqi poet. He is considered as one of the greatest poets in the Arabic language. Much of his poetry revolves around praising the kings he visited during his lifetime. Some consider his 326 poems to be a great representation of his life story. He started writing poetry when he was nine years old. He is well known for his sharp intelligence and wittiness. Al-Mutanabbi had a great pride in himself through his poetry. Among the topics he discussed were courage, the philosophy of life, and the description of battles. Many of his poems were and still are widely spread in today's Arab world and are considered to be proverbial. His great talent brought him very close to many leaders of his time. He praised those leaders and kings in return for money and gifts. His powerful and honest[citation needed] poetic style earned great popularity in his time. Al-Mutanabbi was killed because one of his poems contained a great insult to a man called Dhaba al-Asadi (Arabic: ضبة الأسدي Ḍabba al-ʾAsadī).[citation needed] Dhaba, along with his Uncle Fatik al-Asadi (Arabic: فاتك الأسدي Fātik al-ʾAsadī), were determined to kill Al-Mutanabbi because of that poem which contained a great insult to Dhaba. They managed to intercept Al-Mutanabbi, his son Muhassad (Arabic: محسد Muḥassad), and his servant near Baghdad. Ibn Rachik reported that when Al-Mutanabbi wished to flee, his servant awkwardly reminded him of his bold verses; Al-Mutanabbi resolved to live up to them, fought, and died along with his companions in 965.)

The Best Poem Of Abu at-Tayyib al-Mutanabbi

Courage

Courage to reason second place must take.
For valour should not balanced judgment shake.
But if both in a hard soul united are,
Then Glory's realms their own demesne shall make.

Abu at-Tayyib al-Mutanabbi Comments

Jaser 23 December 2017

Jaser4aziz4@gmail.com

2 2 Reply

Abu at-Tayyib al-Mutanabbi Popularity

Abu at-Tayyib al-Mutanabbi Popularity

Close
Error Success