Alfred Lord Tennyson

(6 August 1809 – 6 October 1892 / Lincoln / England)

Alfred Lord Tennyson Poems

41. The Princess: A Medley: Our Enemies Have Fall'N 1/1/2004
42. To Edward Lear: On His Travels In Greece 4/8/2010
43. To J. S. 1/1/2004
44. The Lord Of Burleigh 1/1/2004
45. Of Old Sat Freedom On The Heights 1/1/2004
46. In Memoriam A. H. H.: 15. To-Night The Winds Begin To Rise 1/1/2004
47. The Princess: A Medley: Ask Me No More 1/1/2004
48. The Princess (Part 4) 1/1/2004
49. Idylls Of The King: Song From The Marriage Of Geraint 1/1/2004
50. The Princess (Part 5) 1/1/2004
51. In Memoriam A. H. H.: 118. Contemplate All This Work Of Tim 1/1/2004
52. The Princess: A Medley: Come Down, O Maid 1/1/2004
53. The Princess (Part 6) 1/1/2004
54. The Princess (Part 3) 1/1/2004
55. Minnie And Winnie 1/1/2004
56. Geraint And Enid 1/1/2004
57. In Memoriam A. H. H.: 44. How Fares It With The Happy Dead? 1/1/2004
58. In Memoriam A. H. H.: 72. Risest Thou Thus, Dim Dawn, Again 1/1/2004
59. The Princess (Part 2) 1/1/2004
60. In Memoriam A. H. H.: 99. Risest Thou Thus, Dim Dawn, Again 1/1/2004
61. The Death Of The Old Year 4/8/2010
62. In Memoriam A. H. H.: 82. I Wage Not Any Feud With Death 1/1/2004
63. In Memoriam A. H. H.: 121. Sad Hesper O'Er The Buried Sun 1/1/2004
64. The Princess: A Medley: As Thro' The Land 1/1/2004
65. Hendecasyllabics 1/1/2004
66. The Talking Oak 1/1/2004
67. The Marriage Of Geraint 1/1/2004
68. The Princess: A Medley: Now Sleeps The Crimson Petal 1/1/2004
69. The Mermaid 4/8/2010
70. In Memoriam A. H. H.: 67. When On My Bed The Moonlight Fall 1/1/2004
71. The Princess: A Medley: Tears, Idle Tears 1/1/2004
72. In Memoriam A. H. H. Obiit Mdcccxxxiii: 3. O Sorrow, Cruel 1/1/2004
73. Late, Late, So Late 1/1/2004
74. In Memoriam A. H. H.: 78. Again At Christmas Did We Weave 1/1/2004
75. The Princess: A Medley: Thy Voice Is Heard 1/1/2004
76. Move Eastward, Happy Earth 1/1/2004
77. The Skipping-Rope 4/8/2010
78. In Memoriam A. H. H.: 105. To-Night Ungather'D Let Us Leave 1/1/2004
79. In Memoriam A. H. H.: 2. Old Yew, Which Graspest At The Sto 1/1/2004
80. In Memoriam A. H. H.: Is It, Then, Regret For Buried Time 1/1/2004

Comments about Alfred Lord Tennyson

  • keith coldwell (3/28/2018 2:15:00 AM)

    I have searched and searched for 'The Children's Hospital' by Tennyson on various sites without success. Has this poem been removed from Tennyson's canon? If so, Why?

    3 person liked.
    3 person did not like.
  • Nanci Lesley (3/9/2018 11:29:00 AM)

    The Eagle is sublime, written in iambic pentameter, in intense lines that illustrate the power and singular independence, and perhaps loneliness, of such a remarkable beauty and physical powers. Tennyson captures the spirit of this elite bird whose acumen and thought are pure wonder.

  • Steven (3/7/2018 8:42:00 PM)

    Love this

  • ramesh chordiya (2/11/2018 4:38:00 AM)

    too gooood
    nice poems

  • David Mccann (1/29/2017 9:04:00 PM)

    For interest of those who love all things Tennyson!

    We say an “Heliographic” photo, as this is what it appears to be to us, perhaps experts in photography could be precise as to what kind of process was taken to produce this photo-like image in 1856.

    1856 is the same year Thomas Woolner sculpt this plaster cast, which is one of the best-known portrait reliefs of the poet Alfred Tennyson.

    As you can see in this listing we are selling both the “Heliographic” photo, that seems was taken for John Henry Robinson to 'copy' and create the final engraving which is also for sale as a pair.

    What is interesting is that Robinson has placed the photographic image onto stiff card – in the top left and right corners are pin holes and how he would have mounted it to work from; around the outer edge is pencil drawing and so he can complete a fine outer circle around the image, the same seems to be the case with pencil shading directly on the eyes, parts of the head and hair. – The size of this card is 13cm x 9.8cm, the image is 7cm in circumference.

    The ‘proof before letters’ stipple engraving is printed on traditional stiff paper; size 12.5cm x 10.2cm – and the image is 7.5cm in circumference.

    These extremely rare items are historic pieces of ‘art’ and rare as hens teeth. We have listed it at £350 for the pair, and should imagine were they to go to auction would sell for much higher.

    Note: We have also listed this under the 'engravings/prints' section on Etsy, whatever category it sells in first the other listing will immediately be removed.

    NOTE: All other similar engravings either on the National Portrait Gallery, The Royal Academy of Art, Victoria & Albert Museum, British Museum and commercial or private dealers are not as rare as what’s been listed here; theirs are ‘copies’, prints made after these originals. Our collection is 100% genuine and sourced directly from John Henry Robinson’s own portfolio - see further details below.

    Woolner considered it the best portrait roundel he had ever made, even though he had to adapt it to appease the poet’s wife, Emily, who requested that he shorten the nose to ennoble the profile. Tennyson’s poetry was a rich source of inspiration to the Pre-Raphaelites.

    This link shows you a ‘copy’ of what we have listed;
    http: //www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx? objectId=3667550&partId=1&searchText=John+Henry+Robinson&page=1

  • Arya Goswami Arya Goswami (12/17/2015 5:49:00 AM)

    Ah, just unbelievable Bernie Tennyson penned a comment here. No alacrity in assuming that his blood has got the fragrance of those verses his father wrote, even if he's not so good at verses just like his father! It seems as if poetry came to Lord Tennyson just naturally as if he was just to be renowned by the glorious name 'Tennyson'!

  • Qadr Amir (12/21/2013 10:26:00 AM)

    To Bernie Tennyson: I feel honored to talk with you as Alfred Lord Tennyson is one of my favorite poets. I recommend you IN MEMORIAM as it kind a fits with your situation. It is a requiem for the poet's beloved Cambridge friend Arthur Henry Hallam, who died suddenly of a cerebral haemorrhage in Vienna in 1833.

  • Bernie Tennyson (6/26/2013 8:10:00 PM)

    I recently looked into my Family Tree as sadly my Father passed away January last gone at 56yrs young! ! My mam sadly passed 5yrs before at the age of 52yrs young. I myself is 33 years of age. I have discovered that Alfred Lord Tennyson is one of my Ancestors. My father used to write poems as a hobbie but he was great at it. I now cant stop reading his work and think its fantastic. Could anyone suggest a poem to me that i can dedicate to both my parents please. I miss them so much and would like to get it printed and framed. I have yet to read loads more, any suggestions? ? Thank you for taking the time to read this comment.

  • Julia Sawyer (6/26/2013 12:28:00 PM)

    There was a poem called To Julia on Her birthday unpublished by Alfred Lord Tennyson, I took it to Sotheby's to be sold in the70's along with other poems written by Tennysons own hand they said that it was not valuable enough, but they wouldn't return it to me, over the years I have requested it back but have had no reply from them, has anyone heard of it I believe he is referring to Julia Cameron who was the famous photographer during Tennyson's time

  • Woofwoof Ray (4/18/2013 7:06:00 AM)

    His poems are fantastic. My favourites are Break break break, Now sleeps the crimson petal (great version of this set to music in the film Vanity fair with Reese Witherspoon) , Come into the garden maud, The lady of Shallott, Crossing the bar

Best Poem of Alfred Lord Tennyson

The Brook

I come from haunts of coot and hern,
I make a sudden sally
And sparkle out among the fern,
To bicker down a valley.

By thirty hills I hurry down,
Or slip between the ridges,
By twenty thorpes, a little town,
And half a hundred bridges.

Till last by Philip's farm I flow
To join the brimming river,
For men may come and men may go,
But I go on for ever.

I chatter over stony ways,
In little sharps and trebles,
I bubble into eddying bays,
I babble on the pebbles.

With many a curve my banks I fret
By many a field and...

Read the full of The Brook

The Grandmother

I.
And Willy, my eldest-born, is gone, you say, little Anne?
Ruddy and white, and strong on his legs, he looks like a man.
And Willy's wife has written: she never was over-wise,
Never the wife for Willy: he would n't take my advice.

II.
For, Annie, you see, her father was not the man to save,
Had n't a head to manage, and drank himself into his grave.

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