Emily Dickinson

(10 December 1830 – 15 May 1886 / Amherst / Massachusetts)

Bird - Poem by Emily Dickinson

A bird came down the walk:
He did not know I saw;
He bit an angle-worm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw.

And then he drank a dew
From a convenient grass,
And the hopped sideways to the wall
To let a beetle pass.

He glanced with rapid eyes
That hurried all abroad, -
They looked like frightened beads, I thought
He stirred his velvet head.

Like one in danger; cautious,
I offered him a crumb,
And he unrolled his feathers
And rolled him softer home

Then oars divide the ocean,
Too silver for a seam,
Or butterflies, off banks of noon,
Leap, plashless, as they swim.


Comments about Bird by Emily Dickinson

  • (6/15/2016 12:54:00 PM)


    .........the little bird is endearing, I love the line he bit an angle-worm in halves and ate the fellow, raw
    .....love this poem, one of my favorites of her collection..

    .....and also, this poem is listed twice...see the poem titled a bird came down
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  • (5/6/2014 8:09:00 PM)


    Such a sweet poem! Love it :) (Report) Reply

  • Brian Jani (4/29/2014 1:29:00 AM)


    What a nice poem.I like it (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: ocean, silver, home, butterfly, swimming



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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