Federico García Lorca

(5 June 1898 – 19 August 1936 / Fuente Vaqueros)

Gacela Of The Dead Child - Poem by Federico García Lorca

Each afternoon in Granada,
each afternoon, a child dies.
Each afternoon the water sits down
and chats with its companions.

The dead wear mossy wings.
The cloudy wind and the clear wind
are two pheasants in flight through the towers,
and the day is a wounded boy.

Not a flicker of lark was left in the air
when I met you in the caverns of wine.
Not the crumb of a cloud was left in the ground
when you were drowned in the river.

A giant of water fell down over the hills,
and the valley was tumbling with lilies and dogs.
In my hands' violet shadow, your body,
dead on the bank, was an angel of coldness.


Comments about Gacela Of The Dead Child by Federico García Lorca

  • (11/12/2017 2:19:00 PM)


    Imagery/figurative language welll handled. Sound and cadence less so. (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: angel, water, wind, river, child, dog, children



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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