William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet Ciii - Poem by William Shakespeare

Alack, what poverty my Muse brings forth,
That having such a scope to show her pride,
The argument all bare is of more worth
Than when it hath my added praise beside!
O, blame me not, if I no more can write!
Look in your glass, and there appears a face
That over-goes my blunt invention quite,
Dulling my lines and doing me disgrace.
Were it not sinful then, striving to mend,
To mar the subject that before was well?
For to no other pass my verses tend
Than of your graces and your gifts to tell;
And more, much more, than in my verse can sit
Your own glass shows you when you look in it.


Comments about Sonnet Ciii by William Shakespeare

  • Fabrizio Frosini (11/7/2015 10:24:00 AM)


    In the previous Sonnet had been set forth the thought that poetical eulogy and embellishment can add nothing to perfect truth and beauty. They are to be regarded rather as injurious. The thought here presented is essentially the same. And the concluding lines furnish an excuse for the poet's previous silence. (Report) Reply

    5 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • Brian Jani (4/26/2014 9:15:00 AM)


    Awesome I like this poem, check mine out (Report) Reply

  • (12/26/2013 12:53:00 AM)


    .............love the theme and the rhyme...so beautifully written.. (Report) Reply

  • Egal Bohen (2/13/2008 2:05:00 PM)


    For limited by words are we
    To draw in verse such symetry
    And words imperfect, soiled by man
    Cannot true beauty understand
    (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: poverty, pride, sonnet



Poem Submitted: Friday, May 18, 2001

Poem Edited: Friday, May 18, 2001


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