Randy McClave

Gold Star - 12,709 Points (Ashland, Kentucky)

The Brown Noser - Poem by Randy McClave

They stick their noses so far up management's ass
That they become the laughing stock to the working-class,
Their noses are always seen covered with fetus and brown
And to management they are known as suck-ups and a clown;
But, to the working man they are known only as a poser
But, to everyone else they are greeted as the brown noser.

They had probably started out life as a teacher's pet
When their classmates wouldn't give them any attention or respect,
So, they became the sycophant, also known as fawning parasites
They are servile flatterers with quick advancement appetites;
For their sole advancement they are always self-seeking
And sometimes if you listen closely, you can even hear them squeaking.

They will laugh at their bosses stories which are not at all funny
And to look at them closely, you will begin to see their noses runny,
They will always agree and support with what their bosses say
And if they could they would only work for compliments, instead of pay;
From their bosses they will always seek their acknowledgement and approval
As long as their noses are shoved up their bosses asses without a removal.

They always seek favors from their bosses in an obsequious manner
As though ass-kissing is their scheme and they are the pleased planner,
They practice to curry favors by the excessive use of compliments or praise
And they don't care who knows of their ultimate bootlicking displays;
Those kiss-ups and ass kissers and adulators are easy to expose
As they are the lackeys and grovelers with the brown nose.

Randy L. McClave

Topic(s) of this poem: job


Comments about The Brown Noser by Randy McClave

  • Kelly Kurt (3/29/2015 1:19:00 PM)


    good poem. We can all relate. Thanks for sharing. (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Sunday, March 29, 2015



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