Sidi J. Mahtrow


The Roost - Poem by Sidi J. Mahtrow

The Convention of Crows was intended.
To debate a subject oft suspended.
Needed was guidance to mankind's wonders
In avoiding dogmas and politically incorrect blunders.

How best to approach those who knew not what
And for that matter gave not a squat.
Did evolution really matter much at all
When considering man's biblical fall?

The old crow who was most literate
Spoke first to those who did patiently wait.
'Erasmus D. had the idea first begun
Twisted in poems of Nature that he spun.

Linnaeus and others certainly laid the foundation
For current thinking about evolution.
And from the New World's distant shore
There was the wandering scientist (Rafinesque) , with ideas galore.

Rev. Wilberforce and others were in a rage
Because their credentials were out of phase.
The spokesman for Charles D. was a learned man
Who unlike the others had a devious plan.

Thomas Huxley was a great debater.
(Actually a religion hater) .
Who took Charles D's ideas as his own
Since he had none of his, to atone.'

Then spoke up the youngest crow with feathers shiny
'Cut to the chase and don't expose your hinny.
The object of the debate is to show
That there is a goal in Nature's plan.'

'Enough. You have hardly learned to fly
And say without God, you'll get by.
What is Nature, but God's other name?
The beginning, existence and ending are the same.

If you deny there is a God for sure
And it turns out that your wrong - it's going to be hell to endure.
While if you are right and there is no God
Your existence here matters not a dirt clod.

But if there is a God who has a plan
And you accept him like the common man.
Then your fate is sure and rewards await
As you fly through the pearly gate.

Perhaps you believe and when your time comes,
There is no God that provides eternal life for some.
What have you lost but some time on earth
Where you did well for others and proved your worth?

So you see, Junior, it is best
To consider the outcome with the rest.
Protest (or caw-caw-caw) with the others
But, the rising-setting sun's proof there's an order to our universe.

Call it evolution if you like
But notice that man can't fly,
Or migrate easily,
They must remain and work which is a pity.

They grow fat, old and grey
And disease ends their turn on earth, in a ghastly way.
But we just spread our wings and away we fly
To better worlds, through the friendly sky.

Here we crows debate evolution
But with a lot less commotion.
They studied coral, flowers, moths and bees
Yet overlooked us here in the trees.

They fight and die at each others whim
And never give much thought if evolution is a sham.
They are on the wrong track.
Eating themselves into an early grave - their god‘s a morning snack.

The other Corvus listened to the discussion
And finally in unison
Spoke out with loud and discordant cry
As they leapt from their perch and soared in the sky.

'Darwin was right, It was (and is) the Descent of Man
Screwing up the earth (and universe) without plan.
While we evolved to a greater life
They remain behind with all their strife.

Call it evolution. Sure you can,
And claim there is no God (or Nature's plan) .
But if man doesn't learn from his mistakes
He'll become one of God's off-takes.

And abandon the good land and skies
To us that relish freedom without disguise.
Mankind on its current path will waste away
But we'll survive to enjoy another day.

So deny, if you like, the great plan.
But remember evolution does not always benefit Man.'


Comments about The Roost by Sidi J. Mahtrow

There is no comment submitted by members..



Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?



Poem Submitted: Monday, June 18, 2007

Poem Edited: Sunday, March 13, 2011


Famous Poems

  1. Still I Rise
    Maya Angelou
  2. The Road Not Taken
    Robert Frost
  3. If You Forget Me
    Pablo Neruda
  4. Dreams
    Langston Hughes
  5. Annabel Lee
    Edgar Allan Poe
  6. If
    Rudyard Kipling
  7. Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening
    Robert Frost
  8. Do Not Stand At My Grave And Weep
    Mary Elizabeth Frye
  9. I Do Not Love You Except Because I Love You
    Pablo Neruda
  10. Television
    Roald Dahl
[Report Error]