Ogden Nash

(August 19, 1902 – May 19, 1971 / New York / United States)

Ogden Nash
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Born Frederick Ogden Nash on August 19, 1902 in Rye, New York.

An ancestor, General Francis Nash, gave his name to Nashville, Tennessee.

Raised in Rye, New York and Savannah, Georgia. Educated at St. George's School in Rhode Island and, briefly, Harvard University.

Started work writing advertising copy for Doubleday, Page Publishing, New York, in 1925.

Published first book for children, The Cricket of Caradon in 1925.

First published poem Spring Comes to Murray Hill appears in New Yorker magazine in 1930.

Joins staff at New Yorker in 1932.

Married Frances Rider Leonard on June 6, 1933. ... more »

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Quotations

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  • ''I think remorse ought to stop biting the consciences that feed it.''
    Ogden Nash (1902-1971), U.S. poet. "A Clean Conscience Never Relaxes," I'm a Stranger Here Myself (1938).
  • ''One man's remorse is another man's reminiscence.''
    Ogden Nash (1902-1971), U.S. poet. A Clean Conscience Never Relaxes, I'm a Stranger Here Myself (1938).
  • ''Remorse is a violent dyspepsia of the mind.''
    Ogden Nash (1902-1971), U.S. poet. "A Clean Conscience Never Relaxes," I'm a Stranger Here Myself (1938).
  • ''A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of.''
    Ogden Nash (1902-1971), U.S. poet. A Dog's Best Friend Is his Illiteracy, The Private Dining Room (1953).
  • ''I do not like to get the news, because there has never been an era when so many things were going so right for so many of the wrong persons.''
    Ogden Nash (1902-1971), U.S. poet. Everybody Tells Me Everything, The Face Is Familiar (1940).
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Comments about Ogden Nash

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  • Lynn geer (1/18/2018 9:22:00 AM)

    Here comes me in my brand new car. Who knows this one

  • Stephen M. Marson, Ph.D. (1/14/2018 11:42:00 AM)

    Nash had a line in one of his poems that included the idea that if he had a million dollars he would write a book and with the million he would buy all his books concluding that he would be rich living off the royalies and he would have a bunch of really good books. Anyone know the poem?

  • Arthur Panaro (12/23/2017 12:24:00 PM)

    Ogden included in a poem a play on the word gorgonzola.... who knows this one?

  • Will S. (12/16/2017 3:39:00 PM)

    Question. There's a poem about cocktails. One verse is... There's something a bout a martini...
    ...It may be the vermouth, but to tell you the truth I think it's the gin. Or something like that.
    Does anyone know the name of the poem, or that verse?

  • Betty (11/13/2017 1:23:00 PM)

    I was taught a Nash poem many years ago, I thought was called November:
    No morn
    no noon
    no night
    no noon
    November.
    Has anyone ever heard it before?

  • hhhzyehd (11/10/2017 1:10:00 PM)

    Juajesmee

    Jsuejusjejwjjsjsjje

  • Embee Cee (10/2/2016 4:44:00 PM)

    From _Many Long Years Ago: _

    THE PARTY

    Come Arabella, fetch the cake,
    On a dish with silver handles.
    Oh mercy! Feel the table shake!
    Lucinda, light the candles.
    For Mr. Migg is thir-ty,
    Is thir- ty,
    Is thir- -ty.
    The years are crawling over him
    Like wee red ants.
    Oh, three times ten is thir-ty,
    Is for- ty,
    Is fif- -ty.
    The further off from England
    The nearer is to France.

    The little flames they bob and jig,
    The dining hall is breezy.
    Quick! puff your candles, Mr. Migg,
    The little flames die easy.
    For Mr. Migg is for-ty,
    Is for- ty,
    Is for- -ty.
    The years are crawling over him
    Like wee red ants.
    Oh, four times ten is for-ty,
    Is fif- ty,
    Is six- -ty,
    And creeping through the icing,
    The other years advance.

    Why Arabella, here's a ring!
    Lucinda, here's a thimble!
    For Mr. Migg there's not a thing-
    'Tis not, I trust, a symbol!
    For Mr. Migg is fif-ty,
    Is fif- ty,
    Is fif- -ty.
    The years are crawling over him
    Like wee red ants.
    Oh, five times ten is fif-ty,
    Is six- ty,
    Is seven- -ty.
    Lucinda, put the cake away.
    We're going to the dance.

  • Linda Noble Linda Noble (4/23/2016 9:30:00 AM)

    For years snippets of a Nash poem come to my mind near my birthday: The years are crawling over us like wee red ants. Put away the cake Miranda, we're all going to dance! I have googled this repeatedly from year to year, with no success. Please help! I know I read it in a Public Speaking class in high school, about 1963. Redding, California.

  • Beverly Margolis-kurtin (10/30/2014 8:09:00 PM)

    I've been hunting down the parody that the honorable Mr.Nash did on Poe's The Raven. I tried several times to perform it during a public speaking course and never could make it all the way through without cracking up myself along with the class.
    His bit about a pelican is my all time favorite. I abhor people who try to blandly try to SAY limericks instead of performing them as they should be.
    I'd love to find his Raven. It was in my English textbook which, sadly for me, I lost a few decades ago.

  • S B (5/5/2014 5:50:00 PM)

    Amazing poet! Truly a classic poet who can use words to his advantage

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