Herbert Nehrlich

Rookie (04 October 1943 / Germany)

About Dipples - Poem by Herbert Nehrlich

I look around for strictly scientific reasons,
to ascertain just what it is that makes the diff.
I spend considerable time here on the beach in all four seasons,
and while observing all and finally asking if
there is a rationale for wearing a bikini,
in contrast to the one-piece of time-honoured tradition.
You see all types and sizes, some the colour of zucchini,
and others ready to attend a fancy Hollywood audition.

I am a breast man, as I have confessed before,
which does not mean I 'm smitten with a singular obsession.
I find myself, when looking, always wishing more
of those two wonders would peek out from their cozy, warm recessions.

So, the bikini shows a bit, and also belly,
and often nosy hairs of pubic regions.
A girl that comes to mind, her Christian name is Ellie,
is an example of it all, but my allegiance
is not confined, as both those garments give me temporary pleasure.
I know that nudity takes all the fun away,
by flaunting so much skin and so much female treasure.
It dulls the senses and affects our sense of play.

I guess it must be that I like to fantasise
what's underneath that woven fabric, hiding well.
It gives a smidgen of a promise to my eyes
and, after all, rags simply function as a shell.

So I keep dreaming and imagine how I would
peel all those covers, either one piece or bikini
OFF lovely women, so abundant, and who could
sit in my bar and have a very large Martini.

As Jodilee has pointed to a lovely name,
it's English from way back, the actual word is DIPPLE,
which rhymes with what is hidden, such a shame:
In cups of foam support. I'm talking of the NIPPLE.

And, do you women even guess what nipples do?
Besides their -God's assignment- baby-sucking role?
I do believe that very few would have a clue
how much erotica they harbour on the whole.
They are the titillating image for old geezers
and then they manage to create a pair of DIPPLES.
Those nudge-nudge, wink-wink greetings, kindly meant as teasers,
our lips pray silent words now, whispering: Oh, Nipples!

Addendum:

I do not want you to surmise
that things are as described, plain simple.
No, they are not, let's realise,
that nipples are inverted dimples.
And as you know about those dipples,
these are between dimples and nipples.
To understand here what I mean
you must have reached a certain age
and know the difference between
the cockatoo bird and its cage.

The question now is which is best:
A dimple, dipple or a nipple.
I take the second, you the rest:
The perfect nipple is a dipple.

'Good Heavens and glamorgatroyd',
as old Magoo was known to preach.
Don't show this stuff to Doctor Freud,
I've never seen him on my beach.


Comments about About Dipples by Herbert Nehrlich

  • (9/11/2005 12:11:00 AM)


    Cute Herbert really cute. Fun read! (Report) Reply

    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • (6/22/2005 3:35:00 PM)


    Quite enjoyable, silly even, yet with a touch of class too. (Report) Reply

  • (1/24/2005 11:13:00 AM)


    I thought it was clever and silly.
    The rhyming scheme didn't get to me too much, I was able to keep up.
    the only thing that really stuck out to me, was when you used all caps to spell out 'nipple' and 'dipple'
    For some reason, perhaps just personal preference, I find it annoying.
    Overall though, I got a giggle out of the piece and I must say, you are quite creative.
    Always,
    amberlee
    (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: beach, women, baby, fun, girl, believe, woman, dream



Poem Submitted: Sunday, January 16, 2005

Poem Edited: Sunday, January 16, 2005


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