Confucius

(551– 479 ( BC) / China)

An Ode Appropriate To A Festivity - Poem by Confucius

The dew lies heavy all around,
Nor, till the sun shines, leaves the ground.
Far into night we feasting sit;
We drink, and none his place may quit.

The dew lies heavy, and its gems
Stud the luxuriant, grassy stems.
The happy night with wassail rings;
So feasted here the former kings.

The jujube and the willow-tree
All fretted with the dew we see.
Each guest's a prince of noble line,
In whom the virtues all combine.

The _t'ung_ and _e_ their fruits display,
Pendant from every graceful spray.
My guests are joyous and serene,
No haggard eye, no ruffled mien.


Comments about An Ode Appropriate To A Festivity by Confucius

  • (1/18/2016 8:57:00 AM)


    ...........flows beautifully, a joyful poem....and reads very nicely ★ (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Saturday, September 18, 2010



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