William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet Clii

Poem by William Shakespeare

In loving thee thou know'st I am forsworn,
But thou art twice forsworn, to me love swearing,
In act thy bed-vow broke and new faith torn,
In vowing new hate after new love bearing.
But why of two oaths' breach do I accuse thee,
When I break twenty? I am perjured most;
For all my vows are oaths but to misuse thee
And all my honest faith in thee is lost,
For I have sworn deep oaths of thy deep kindness,
Oaths of thy love, thy truth, thy constancy,
And, to enlighten thee, gave eyes to blindness,
Or made them swear against the thing they see;
For I have sworn thee fair; more perjured I,
To swear against the truth so foul a lie!


Comments about Sonnet Clii by William Shakespeare

  • Fabrizio FrosiniFabrizio Frosini (11/7/2015 10:37:00 AM)

    The poet confesses that his attachment to his dark mistress convicts him of unfaithfulness. She, however, has been not only similarly unfaithful, but unfaithful anew to him. Still, he allows that he is the more untruthful; for, corrupt as she was, he had ascribed to her excellent virtues, and, in defiance of truth, had proclaimed her beautiful.(Report)Reply

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  • Brian JaniBrian Jani (4/26/2014 9:20:00 AM)

    Awesome I like this poem, check mine out(Report)Reply

    1 person liked.
    4 person did not like.
  • * Sunprincess * (1/4/2014 2:20:00 PM)

    .....a nice write....making a vow to love, should always be kept...(Report)Reply

    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
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Read poems about / on: faith, truth, hate, lost, love, sonnet



Poem Submitted: Friday, May 18, 2001



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