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The Arab's Farewell To His Horse

Rating: 2.8

MY beautiful! my beautiful! that standest meekly by
With thy proudly arched and glossy neck, and dark and fiery eye;
Fret not to roam the desert now, with all thy winged speed-
I may not mount on thee again-thou'rt sold, my Arab steed!
Fret not with that impatient hoof-snuff not the breezy wind-
The further that thou fliest now, so far am I behind;
The stranger hath thy bridle rein-thy master hath his gold-
Fleet-limbed and beautiful! farewell! -thou'rt sold, my steed-thou'rt sold!

Farewell! those free untired limbs, full many a mile must roam,

To reach the chill and wintry sky, which clouds the stranger's home;
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COMMENTS OF THE POEM
* Sunprincess * 05 June 2014

........an amazing write.....could envision this beautiful scene....so nicely written..

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Brian Jani 10 May 2014

Very good poem Caroline.

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Lesley O’Neil 10 August 2018

You do realize this was written in the 1800s? It’s a classic.

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Mike Perry 16 December 2017

This poem was recited to me by my mother in the early 50s I was Enchanted then and now.

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Linda Miller 22 February 2020

Norton’s biography is astonishing. This poem always makes me cry.

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Debbie 08 October 2019

aah, the memories of being a young girl with her much adored pony! I still have an arab - a rescue horse, at deaths door - and he's the sweetest little boy. I loved this poem then, and it's as much if not more beautiful now.

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Ibrahim El-Ayoud 07 March 2019

lovely poem

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Jean Sherer 25 February 2019

Poem mentioned in novel of Herman Wouk, The City Boy. I googled it, and poet Caroline Norton was mentioned in a recent Victoria story line. Very interesting.

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Lisa Cashman 13 February 2018

One of my favorite poems- for the last 40 years! As time would have it, I see/feel this poem about people too, not just my horses. Very touching.

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Lesley O’Neil 10 August 2018

Yes—I’ve loved this poem since first reading it in the early 50s (I’m now 76.) used to be repeat the first stanza. Still love it!

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